Monthly Archives: November 2013

Comet ISON Rising

Video Credit & Copyright: Copyright: Juan Carlos Casado (TWAN, Earth and Stars)

Explanation: Will Comet ISON survive tomorrow’s close encounter with the Sun? Approaching to within a solar diameter of the Sun’s surface, the fate of one of the most unusual comets of modern times will finally be determined. The comet could shed a great amount of ice and dust into a developing tail — or break apart completely. Unfortunately, the closer Comet ISON gets to the Sun, the harder it has been for conventional telescopes to see the brightening comet in the glare of the morning Sun. Pictured in the above short time lapse video, Comet ISON was captured rising over the Canary Islands just above the morning Sun a few days ago. If the comet’s nucleus survives, the coma and the tails it sheds might well be visible rising ahead of the Sun in the next few days or weeks. Alternatively, satellites watching the Sun might document one of the larger comet disintegrations yet recorded. Stay tuned!

APOD NASA

Cap Cloud over the Sierra Nevadas

lenticular_montanes_1500

Credit & Copyright: Guido Montañas

Explanation: One might say this was a bell weather day for the Sierra Nevada mountains. In January, just as the Sun was setting above the district of AlbayzМn in Grenada, Spain, a huge cloud appeared as a bell capping the Veleta peak. Such a Cap cloud is formed by air forced upwards by a mountain peak, with the air then cooling, saturating with moisture, and finally having its molecular water condense into cloud droplets. Such a bell-shaped cloud structure is unusual as air typically moves horizontally, making most clouds nearly flat across at the bottom. Vertical waves can also give additional lenticular cloud layers, as also seen above. Given the fleeting extent of the great cloud coupled with momentarily excellent sunset coloring, one might considered this also a bellwether day for an accomplished photographer.

Astronomy Picture Of the Day

The Sun Online and solar activity. November 25, 2013

INFO FROM SIDC – RWC BELGIUM 2013 Nov 25 12:12:38

NOAA AR 1904 was responsible for most flaring activity yesterday, on November 24. Seven C-flares were attributed to this active region which is located in the NE. We expect a similar behaviour: C-flares and the possibility of an isolated M-flare.The solar wind speed is between 300 and 350 km/s. The total interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is below 5 nT. This results in quiet geomagnetic conditions with the Kp and local K of Dourbes below 4.
The small coronal hole (20 degrees N, front boundary around 20 degrees W, 10 degrees wide) might introduce a geomagnetic disturbance limited in strength and in time from late November 26 onwards.

INFO FROM SIDC
Equipment: Coronado 90 + SBIG 8300s + LX75
Processing: Photoshop
Date: 25/11/13
Time GMT: 18:30
Exposure 0.12 sec.
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The Sun Online and solar activity. November 24, 2013

Solar activity was moderate in the past 24 hours, with NOAA AR 1904 producing a M1.0 flare on Nov. 23, 1257 UT peak time, and numerous C flares. This region should keep during the next 48 hours the same level of activity consisting on C flares and a chance for an isolated M class event. In the meanwhile, NOAA AR 1905, close to the East limb is likely to produce C class flares during the same period. Active conditions are therefore expected.Quiet geomagnetic conditions are expected for the next 48 hours. A slight increase to unsettled conditions with an isolated period of active conditions is possible by the end of Nov. 26 as a small coronal hole in the northern hemisphere becomes geoeffective.

INFO FROM SIDC

Equipment: Coronado 90 + SBIG 8300s + LX75
Processing: Photoshop
Date: 24/11/13
Time GMT: 18:00
Exposure 0.12 sec.

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The Sun Online and solar activity. November 23, 2013

NOAA AR 1904, located north of AR 1899 produced a M1.1 flare on Nov. 23, peaking at 0232 UT. There is no indication of a CME associated to that event. This region is likely to maintain a moderate level of flaring activity in the next 48 hours, essentially C flares, with a fair chance for an isolated M class event, due to its proximity with AR 1899. Active conditions are therefore foreseen for the next 48 hours.Quiet to unsettled geomagnetic conditions are currently observed at planetary and local level (Dourbes). ACE measurements show some slight excursions of the Bz component of the interplanetary magnetic field down to -10 nT. This weak disturbance is probably linked to a sector boundary crossing, that occurred late on Nov. 22. We expect mostly quiet conditions for the next 48 hours.

INFO FROM SIDC

Equipment: Coronado 90 + SBIG 8300s + LX75
Processing: Photoshop
Date: 23/11/13
Time GMT: 18:00
Exposure 0.12 sec.

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Carpe noctem

zemlya-nochyu-3

Images by NASA

The Sun Online and solar activity. November 22, 2013

Solar activity is expected to be at most eruptive for the next 48 hours with risk for C class flares from NOAA ARs 1897 and 1899. The M flare of Nov. 21 was associated with a CME, but it does not appear to be geoeffective. Quiet geomagnetic conditions are expected for the next 48 hours. Current interplanetary conditions are very quiet.

INFO FROM SIDC

Equipment: Coronado 90 + SBIG 8300s + LX75
Processing: Photoshop
Date: 22/11/13
Time GMT: 18:00
Exposure 0.12 sec.

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The Sun Online and solar activity. November 21, 2013

NOAA AR 1893 produced a M1.2 flare on November 21, peaking at 1111 UT. Very few information is currently available on this event, but it seems that, besides a weak type III burst no other radio emission is associated with it. Coronagraphic observations are not yet available, but SDO data hint at a CME signature. Owing to the position of AR 1893 on the west limb, a CME, if confirmed, would very likely not be geoeffective. We foresee mostly eruptive conditions for the next 48 hours, with C class flares possible from NOAA ARs 1893, 1897 and 1899. A small sunspot group emerged north of AR 1899, but it is too soon to evaluate its flaring capacity for the forecast period. An extra isolated M flare is not completely excluded from NOAA AR 1893 before it rotates behind the west limb.  We expect quiet geomagnetic conditions for the next 48 hours. All CMEs observed in the past 24 hours appear to be non geoeffective, including a partial halo CME, observed by LASCO on Nov. 21 at 0125 UT (backside event).
INFO FROM SIDC

Equipment: Coronado 90 + SBIG 8300s + LX75
Processing: Photoshop
Date: 21/11/13
Time GMT: 14:00
Exposure 0.12 sec.

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