M3: globular cluster in Canes Venatici

2665cad4388b6740ff4147608ee8b178.1824x0_q100_watermark
Messier 3 (also known as M3 or NGC 5272) is a globular cluster of stars in the northern constellation of Canes Venatici. It was discovered by Charles Messier on May 3, 1764, and resolved into stars by William Herschel around 1784. Since then, it has become one of the best-studied globular clusters. Identification of the cluster’s unusually large variable star population was begun in 1913 by American astronomer Solon Irving Bailey and new variable members continue to be identified up through 2004.
This cluster is one of the largest and brightest, and is made up of around 500,000 stars. It is estimated to be 8 billion years old. It is located at a distance of about 33,900 light-years away from Earth.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: AT6RC
Imaging cameras: Canon EOS 1000D / Rebel XS
Mounts: Orion Atlas EQ-G
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Orion Mini Guide Scope
Guiding cameras: Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager & Autoguider
Focal reducers: TeleVue 0.8x
Software: DeepSkyStacker, PHD guiding, photoshop, Canon EOS
Dates: May 11, 2012
Frames: 90×120″ ISO1600
Integration: 3.0 hours

Autor: Mike Carroll

10 March 2014

We select the best works of amateur astrophotographers with details of equipment, shooting processing etc.