Tulip nebula

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The Tulip Nebula, or Sharpless 101 (Sh2-101) or the Cygnus Star Cloud is an emission nebula located in the constellation Cygnus. It is so named because it appears to resemble the outline of a tulip when imaged photographically. It was catalogued by astronomer Stewart Sharpless in his 1959 catalog of nebulae. It lies at a distance of about 6,000 light-years (5.7×1016 km; 3.5×1016 mi) from Earth.

The Tulip nebula, at least in the field seen from earth, is in close proximity to microquasar Cygnus X-1, site of one of the first suspected black holes. Cygnus X-1 is the brighter of the two stars (lower star) in close vertical proximity just to the right of the Tulip nebula in the image presented here.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Orion Optics UK CT8
Imaging cameras: SBIG ST-8300M
Mounts: Losmandy G11
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Orion Optics UK CT8
Guiding cameras: Starlight Xpress Lodestar guide camera
Focal reducers: Baader Planetarium RCC
Software: Maxim DL, photoshop
Filters: Baader Planetarium OIII 8.5nm, Baader Planetarium 7nm H-Alpha
Accessories: Celestron Radial Guider
Dates: June 8, 2014, June 18, 2014
Frames:
Baader Planetarium 7nm H-Alpha: 23×900″ bin 1×1
Baader Planetarium OIII 8.5nm: 15×900″ bin 2×2
Integration: 9.5 hours

Author: Jacek Bobowik
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 23 June 2014