Daily Archives: July 10, 2014

The Sun Online and solar activity. July 10, 2014

Two partial halo CMEs were observed in coronagraphic imagery. The first CME (first measurement in SOHO/LASCO C2 at 16:36 UT on July 9) was associated with a filament eruption occurring near S00E15 and is propagating east from the Sun-Earth line with a  projected plane of the sky speed of 520 km/s (CACTus estimation).  
The second CME (first measurement in SOHO/LASCO C2 at 7:12 UT on July 10) was associated with a prominence eruption occurring near Catania region 3 (NOAA AR 2104) and is propagating west from the Sun-Earth line with a  projected plane of the sky speed of 760 km/s (CACTus  estimation).  For the first CME, the arrival of a glancing blow from the CME-driven shock wave is expected on July 13 near 0 UT. The  second CME has less chances to arrive at Earth, but minor signatures of arrival might still be possible on the UT morning of July 13.
SIDC

Equipment: Coronado 90 +  Imaging Source DMK  + LX75
Processing: Photoshop, Avistack 300 frames
Date: 07/10/14
Time UT: 16:00
Exposure 1/500 sec.

Observatory Sponli

  

Noctilucent Clouds over London 

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Image Credit & Copyright: Christoph Malin (TWAN)
 

 This scene from the early morning hours of July 3 looks out across the River Thames from the Westminster Bridge. Part of a luminous timelapse video (vimeo), the frame captures a sight familiar in London, the nighttime glow of the London Eye. But a not-so-familiar sight is shining in the still dark sky above, widespread noctilucent clouds. From the edge of space, about 80 kilometers above Earth’s surface, the icy clouds can still reflect sunlight even though the Sun itself is below the horizon as seen from the ground. Usually spotted at high latitudes in summer months the diaphanous apparitions are also known as polar mesospheric clouds. The seasonal clouds are understood to form as water vapor driven into the cold upper atmosphere condenses on the fine dust particles supplied by disintegrating meteors or volcanic ash. NASA’s AIM mission provides daily projections of the noctilucent clouds as seen from space.

APOD NASA 10-Jul-14

Orion’s Belt and nebulae

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Orion’s Belt or the Belt of Orion is an asterism in the constellation Orion. It consists of the three bright stars Alnitak, Alnilam and Mintaka.

Looking for Orion’s Belt in the night sky is the easiest way to locate the constellation Orion in the sky. The stars are more or less evenly spaced in a straight line, and so can be visualized as the belt of the hunter’s clothing. In the Northern hemisphere, they are best visible in the early night sky during the winter, in particular the month of January at around 9.00 pm

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Canon EF 100-300mm f/5.6 L, Intes Micro mn 55
Imaging cameras: Canon EOS 550D / Rebel T2i
Mounts: Sky-Watcher HEQ5
Guiding cameras: QHY5
Software: PHD guiding, Stark Labs Nebulosity 3.1.0, photoshop, Russell Croman gradient xterminator
Filters: Baader 2′ H-Alpha Filter 7nm
Dates: Jan. 8, 2013
Frames: 15×360″
Integration: 1.5 hours

Author: Ivan Jevremovic
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 10 July 2014

The Sun Online and solar activity. July 9, 2014

Catania sunspot regions 6 and 9 (NOAA 2108 and 2109 respectively) are still the largest and most complex regions on the solar disk. However Catania region 16 (NOAA AR 2113) has also grown,  developed to a beta-gamma region and was most active during the past period. Two M-class and five C-class flares were detected by GOES X-ray.  A M1.2 flare, peaking at 00:26 UT on July 9, and an M6.5 flare, peaking at 16:20 UT on July 8, originated from Catania region 16. The M6.5-flare was associated
with dimming, type II and IV radio bursts and a partial halo CME. The CME was first seen in the SOHO/LASCO C2 field of view at 16:36 UT, had an angular width of 126 degrees and a projected plane of the sky speed of 466 km/s (as reported by the CACTus software). The bulk of the CME mass was
ejected east from the Sun-Earth line. The arrival of a glancing blow from the CME-driven shock wave is possible in the evening of July 11. Flaring activity is expected to continue with C-class flares and  possibly an isolated M-class flare.
Solar wind speed is stable near 350 km/s, as measured by ACE. The magnitude of interplanetary magnetic field obtained values between 3 and 8 nT with a mainly negative Bz component. Geomagnetic conditions have been quiet to unsettled and are expected to remain so until the arrival of a fast speed stream that may result in active conditions within the next 24 hours.
SIDC

Equipment: Coronado 90 +  Imaging Source DMK  + LX75
Processing: Photoshop, Avistack 300 frames
Date: 07/09/14
Time UT: 16:00
Exposure 1/500 sec.

Observatory Sponli