Monthly Archives: October 2014

The Sun online and activity solar.25.10.2014

 

 

IDL TIFF file

 

The strongest flare observed on the Sun during the past 24 hours was the X3.1 flare peaking at 21:41 UT yesterday in the Catania sunspot group 88 (NOAA AR 2192). SOHO/LASCO data demonstrate that the flare was accompanied only with a very weak and narrow CME. No geomagnetic consequences are expected. Despite the decrease in the area of the Catania sunspot group 88, it maintains the beta-gamma-delta configuration of its photospheric magnetic field, so we expect the flaring activity up to X-level from this sunspot group. As the Catania sunspot group 88 is currently situated close to the solar central meridian, a major eruption in this active region may lead to a geoeffective CME and a proton event. A long filament in the northern hemisphere is now crossing the solar central meridian. Its possible eruption may lead to an Earth-directed CME.The Earth is currently inside a slow (around 390 km/s) solar wind flow with average (around 5 nT) interplanetary magnetic field magnitude. The geomagnetic conditions are quiet and are expected to remain so.

Equipment: Coronado 90 +  Imaging Source DMK  + LX75
Processing: Photoshop, Avistack 300 frames
Date: 25/10/14
Exposure 1/500 sec.

Observatory Sponli

Capella

3a7ab61b410206a380f35980a2c5916f.1824x0_q100_watermark

Capella is the brightest star in the constellation Auriga, the sixth brightest in the night sky and the third brightest in the northern celestial hemisphere, after Arcturus and Vega. Its name is derived from the diminutive of the Latin capra “goat”, hence “little goat”. Capella also bears the Bayer designation Alpha Aurigae (often abbreviated to α Aurigae, α Aur or Alpha Aur). Although it appears to be a single star to the naked eye, it is actually a star system of four stars in two binary pairs. The first pair consists of two bright, large type-G giant stars, both with a radius around 10 times that of the Sun and two and a half times its mass, in close orbit around each other. Designated Capella Aa and Capella Ab, these two stars are thought to be cooling and expanding on their way to becoming red giants. The second pair, around 10,000 astronomical units from the first, consists of two faint, small and relatively cool red dwarfs. They are designated Capella H and Capella L. The stars labelled Capella C through to G and I through to K are actually unrelated stars in the same visual field. The Capella system is relatively close, at only 42.2 light-years (12.9 pc) from Earth.

Imaging cameras: Canon EOS 6D (unmodified)
Mounts: Benro B4 ballhead, Benro C2580T
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Sigma 105mm f/2.8 EX DG OS HSM macro
Software: Adobe Lightroom 5, Adobe Photoshop CS2, Hugin Team Hugin 2013
Accessories: AstroTrac TT 320
Resolution: 2000×854
Dates: Oct. 16, 2014
Frames: 20×120″
Integration: 0.7 hours
Avg. Moon age: 22.32 days
Avg. Moon phase: 48.17%
RA center: 80.029 degrees
DEC center: 47.317 degrees
Pixel scale: 20.666 arcsec/pixel
Orientation: -46.603 degrees
Field radius: 6.243 degrees

Аuthor: Ville Miettinen, 25.10.2014

Astrophotography of the day of SPONLI

 

The Sun online and activity solar.25.10.2014

IDL TIFF file

Catania sunspot group 88 (NOAA AR 2192) continues to grow and maintains the beta-gamma-delta configuration of its photospheric magnetic field. The strongest flare it produced during the past 24 hours was the M4.0 flare peaking at 07:48 UT today. This flare was accompanied only with a narrow CME that is not expected to arrive at the Earth. We expect the flaring activity up to X-level from this sunspot group. As the Catania sunspot group 88 is currently situated close to the solar central meridian, a major eruption in this active region may lead to a geoeffective CME and a proton event. A long filament in the northern hemisphere is approaching the solar central meridian. Its possible eruption may lead to an Earth-directed CME. The Earth is currently inside a slow (around 430 km/s) solar wind flow with average (around 6 nT) interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) magnitude. The geomagnetic conditions are quiet and are expected to remain so, with isolated intervals of active conditions (K = 4) possible but unlikely.

Andromeda Galaxy

bbc8238c874b73b0cae202944ec741f7.1824x0_q100_watermark_watermark_opacity-10_watermark_text-Copyright by  Siggi's Blog

The Andromeda Galaxy /ænˈdrɒmɨdə/ is a spiral galaxy approximately 2.5 million light-years (2.4×1019 km) from Earth in theAndromeda constellation. Also known as Messier 31, M31, or NGC 224, it is often referred to as the Great Andromeda Nebula in older texts. The Andromeda Galaxy is the nearest spiral galaxy to our Milky Way galaxy, but not the nearest galaxy overall. It gets its name from the area of the sky in which it appears, the constellation of Andromeda, which was named after the mythological princess Andromeda. The Andromeda Galaxy is the largest galaxy of the Local Group, which also contains the Milky Way, the Triangulum Galaxy, and about 30 other smaller galaxies.

The Andromeda Galaxy is probably the most massive galaxy in the Local Group as well,[7] despite earlier findings that suggested that the Milky Way contains more dark matter and could be the most massive in the grouping. The 2006 observations by the Spitzer Space Telescope revealed that M31 contains one trillion (1012) stars: at least twice the number of stars in the Milky Way galaxy, which is estimated to be 200–400 billion.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Lacerta FN2008c-flat
Imaging cameras: Olympus E-M5
Mounts: SkyWatcher AZ EQ6
Guiding telescopes or lenses: SkyWatcher 9×50 Sucher
Guiding cameras: Lacerta MGEN 2
Software: ACDSee 7 Pro
Resolution: 4608×3456
Dates: Sept. 24, 2014
Locations: Siegfried
Frames: 1×251″ ISO800
Integration: 0.1 hours
Darks: ~1
Avg. Moon age: 29.28 days
Avg. Moon phase: 0.07%
Temperature: 12.00
RA center: 10.660 degrees
DEC center: 41.315 degrees
Pixel scale: 0.952 arcsec/pixel
Orientation: 11.728 degrees
Field radius: 0.762 degrees

Аutor: iamsiggi, 24.10.2014

Astrophotography of the day of SPONLI

Triangulum Galaxy

d0a3040aa1b08f7c60bce12e42b47737.1824x0_q100_watermark

The Triangulum Galaxy is a spiral galaxy approximately 3 million light-years (ly) from Earth in the constellation Triangulum. It is catalogued as Messier 33 or NGC 598, and is sometimes informally referred to as the Pinwheel Galaxy, a nickname it shares withMessier 101. The Triangulum Galaxy is the third-largest member of the Local Group of galaxies, which includes the Milky Way, theAndromeda Galaxy and about 44 other smaller galaxies. It is one of the most distant permanent objects that can be viewed with the naked eye.

The Triangulum Galaxy was probably discovered by the Italian astronomer Giovanni Battista Hodierna before 1654. In his work De systemate orbis cometici; deque admirandis coeli caracteribus (“About the systematics of the cometary orbit, and about the admirable objects of the sky”), he listed it as a cloud-like nebulosity or obscuration and gave the cryptic description, “near the Triangle hinc inde“. This is in reference to the constellation of Triangulum as a pair of triangles. The magnitude of the object matches M33, so it is most likely a reference to the Triangulum galaxy.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Takahashi TSA-120
Imaging cameras: QSI 683WSG
Mounts: Takahashi EM200 Temma 2
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Borg Mini 50mm Guidescope
Guiding cameras: Orion Starshoot autoguider
Software: Stark-Labs Nebulosity
Resolution: 3197×2241
Dates: Oct. 15, 2014
Frames: 22×600”
Integration: 3.7 hours
Avg. Moon age: 21.41 days
Avg. Moon phase: 57.78%
RA center: 23.482 degrees
DEC center: 30.690 degrees
Pixel scale: 1.244 arcsec/pixel
Orientation: 89.378 degrees
Field radius: 0.675 degrees

Аuthor: Renae Gage, 23.10.2014

Astrophotography of the day of SPONLI

The Sun online and activity solar

солнце 22 октября

INFO FROM SIDC – RWC BELGIUM 2014 Oct 22 12:44:19

 

INFO FROM SIDC – RWC BELGIUM 2014 Oct 22 12:44:19

 

Three M-class flares were detected in the past 24 hours, all of them

produced by the Catania sunspot group 88 (NOAA AR 2192). The strongest

flare was the M8.7 flare peaking at 01:59 UT. Based on the still incomplete

SOHO/LASCO data and the absence of conspicuous eruptive signatures in the

SDO/AIA data, we conclude that there was no CME associated with this flare.

We expect flaring activity mostly on the M-level in this group, with a good

chance for an X-class flare. As the Catania sunspot group 88 approaches the

solar central meridian, a major eruption in this active region may lead to

a geoeffective CME and a proton event.The Earth is currently inside a slow

(around 460 km/s) solar wind flow with average (around 5 nT) interplanetary

magnetic field magnitude. The geomagnetic conditions are quiet and are

expected to remain so.

Three M-class flares were detected in the past 24 hours, all of them

produced by the Catania sunspot group 88 (NOAA AR 2192). The

Sombrero Galaxy

498050d52fb22d7104183bcd97960ce8.1824x0_q100_watermark

The Sombrero Galaxy (also known as Messier Object 104, M104 or NGC 4594) is an unbarred spiral galaxy in the constellation Virgo located 28 million light-years (8.6 Mpc) from Earth. It has a bright nucleus, an unusually large central bulge, and a prominent dust lane in its inclined disk. The dark dust lane and the bulge give this galaxy the appearance of a sombrero. Astronomers initially thought that the halo was small and light, indicative of a spiral galaxy, but Spitzer found that the halo around the Sombrero Galaxy is larger and more massive than previously thought, indicative of a giant elliptical galaxy. The galaxy has an apparent magnitude of +9.0, making it easily visible with amateur telescopes, and it’s considered by some authors to be the brightest galaxy within a radius of 10 megaparsecs of the Milky Way. The large bulge, the central supermassive black hole, and the dust lane all attract the attention of professional astronomers.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Faulkes Telescope South
Imaging cameras: Fairchild CCD486 BI
Software: DeepSkyStacker, Photoshop
Filters: Bessell-B, SDSS-R, Bessell-V
Resolution: 1098×1469
Dates: June 28, 2013
Locations: Siding Spring Observatory
Frames: 60×60″
Integration: 1.0 hours
Avg. Moon age: 19.90 days
Avg. Moon phase: 73.05%
RA center: 189.998 degrees
DEC center: -11.623 degrees
Pixel scale: 0.405 arcsec/pixel
Orientation: 179.748 degrees
Field radius: 0.103 degrees

Автор: Matthew, 22.10.2014

AstroPhotography of the day of SPONLI

The Sun online and solar activity. 21.10.2014

солнце 21

INFO FROM SIDC - RWC BELGIUM 2014 Oct 21 13:39:38

Catania sunspot group 88 (NOAA AR 2192) continues to grow and maintains the
beta-gamma-delta configuration of its photospheric magnetic field. It
produced four M-class flares in the past 24 hours, the strongest of them
being the M4.5 flare peaking at 16:37 UT. We expect flaring activity mostly
on the M-level in this group, with a good chance for an X-class flare. As
the Catania sunspot group 88 approaches the solar central meridian, a major
eruption in this active region may lead to a geoeffective CME and a proton
event. An active region at the north-east limb (no sunspots are still
visible) produced several flares including the C6.3 flare peaking at 10:58
UT today. It may produce an isolated M-class flare as well. A weak partial
halo CME (angular width around 200 degrees) was first seen in the
SOHO/LASCO C2 field of view at 19:12 UT on October 20. The CME was very
weak and disappeared before reaching the LASCO C3 field of view, so we do
not expect it to arrive at the Earth. The source region of the CME is the
eruption in the Catania sunspot group 88 (NOAA AR 2192) and in the region
to the south-west of it, starting around 18:40 UT, accompanied with coronal
dimmings and the M1.4 flare peaking at 19:02 UT. The solar wind speed is
currently high (around 640 km/s) and the interplanetary magnetic filed
(IMF) magnitude is around 7 nT. Due to elevated values of the IMF magnitude
and predominantly southward IMF direction, the K index reached 5 during one
interval yesterday evening (according to Dourbes, IZMIRAN, and NOAA).
Currently the north-south IMF component Bz is fluctuating around zero, so
we expect quiet to unsettled geomagnetic conditions (K < 4) in the coming
hours, possibly with isolated intervals of active conditions (K = 4).

Orion Nebula

17c02f4e6f013ca894aa7f9d049fcd1a.1824x0_q100_watermark_watermark_opacity-10_watermark_position-6_watermark_text-Copyright Berchan's Observatory

The Orion Nebula (also known as Messier 42, M42, or NGC 1976) is a diffuse nebula situated south of Orion’s Belt in the constellation of Orion. It is one of the brightest nebulae, and is visible to the naked eye in the night sky. M42 is located at a distance of1,344 ± 20 light years and is the closest region of massive star formation to Earth. The M42 nebula is estimated to be 24 light years across. It has a mass of about 2000 times the mass of the Sun. Older texts frequently refer to the Orion Nebula as the Great Nebula in Orion or the Great Orion Nebula.

The Orion Nebula is one of the most scrutinized and photographed objects in the night sky, and is among the most intensely studied celestial features. The nebula has revealed much about the process of how stars and planetary systems are formed from collapsing clouds of gas and dust. Astronomers have directly observed protoplanetary disks, brown dwarfs, intense and turbulent motions of the gas, and the photo-ionizing effects of massive nearby stars in the nebula.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Astro-Tech AT111EDT
Imaging cameras: SBIG STF-8300M
Mounts: Orion Sirius EQ-G Goto
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Orion Mini Guidescope
Guiding cameras: ALccd / QHYCCD QHY5L II mono
Focal reducers: WILLIAM OPTICS P-FLAT 4
Software: Adobe PhotoshopCS6
Filters: Baader LRGB 2″ Filters
Accessories: Starlight Xpress SX USB Filter Wheel 5×2″
Resolution: 3257×2532
Dates: Oct. 16, 2014
Frames: 5×600″
Integration: 0.8 hours
Avg. Moon age: 22.32 days
Avg. Moon phase: 48.17%
RA center: 83.873 degrees
DEC center: -5.354 degrees
Orientation: -164.396 degrees
Field radius: 0.976 degrees

Аuthor: berchan, 21.10.2014

AstroPhotography of the day of SPONLI

The Sun online and solar activity.20.10.2014

солнце 20 октября
INFO FROM SIDC - RWC BELGIUM 2014 Oct 20 13:00:17

Six sunspot groups are reported by Catania today. The main source of the
solar flaring activity is the Catania sunspot group 88 (NOAA AR 2192) that
is growing in size and complexity. Now it has beta-gamma-delta
configuration of its photospheric magnetic field. After yesterday's X1.1
flare, the strongest flare was the M3.9 flare peaking at 09:11 UT today.
This flare was not accompanied by a CME. We expect more flaring activity up
to X-level from this sunspot group. The Earth is currently inside a solar
wind flow with intermediate speeds (around 500-550 km/s). This flow might
be associated with a narrow low-latitude coronal hole that passed the solar
central meridian on October 17-18. The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF)
magnitude was elevated (up to 9 nT), and the IMF was directed predominantly
southward during the last several hours. Intervals of active geomagnetic
conditions (K = 4) were reported by Dourbes and NOAA. We expect quiet to
active geomagnetic conditions in the coming hours.