Daily Archives: December 2, 2014

Sun online and solar activity 01.12.2014

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INFO FROM SIDC – RWC BELGIUM 2014 Dec 01 12:33:26 Several low-level C-class flares and one M-class flare were reported during last 24 hours. A long duration M1.8 flare, observed this morning, peaked at 06:41 UT. The M-class flare, as well as few C-class flares, originated from the Catania sunspot group 24 (NOAA AR 2222) which maintains beta-gamma configuration of its photospheric magnetic field. Currently available data give no indication about possible on disc signatures of the associated CME, therefore, we conclude that the M1.8 flare was most probably confined flare. Four out of ten currently numbered sunspot groups visible on the solar disc have beta-gamma configuration of their photospheric magnetic field and could be the source of the C-class flares and possible also an isolated M-class flare in the coming hours. No Earth directed CMEs were observed during last 24 hours.The Earth is currently inside a slow solar wind, with the speed of about 430 km/s. The interplanetary magnetic field is stable with the magnitude of about 5nT. The geomagnetic conditions are at the moment quiet to unsettled and expected to remain so in the following hours.

Crab Nebula

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The Crab Nebula (catalogue designations M1, NGC 1952, Taurus A) is a supernova remnant and pulsar wind nebula in the constellationof Taurus.Corresponding to a bright supernova recorded by Chinese astronomers in 1054, the nebula was observed later by English astronomer John Bevis in 1731. At an apparent magnitude of 8.4, comparable to that of the largest moon of Saturn, it is not visible to the naked eye but can be made out using binoculars under favourable conditions.

Telescope / lens shooting: Celestron 8 SLT
Camera to capture: Canon Rebel T5i
Mount: CELESTRON Advanced VX
Program: IrfanView, O’Telescope BackyardEOS, Adobe Photoshop CS2, Deep Sky Stacker 3.3.2
Resolution: 4638×3270
Dates: November 28, 2014
Frames: 90×60 ”
Accumulation: 1.5 hours
Avg. Age of the Moon: 5.84 days
Avg. Phase of the Moon: 33.88%
RA Centre: 83.617 degrees
DEC center: 21.983 degrees
Pixel scale: 0.427 arc. sec / pixel
Direction: 100,600 degrees
Radius field: 0.336 degrees
Location: Rolnick Observatory, Westport, Connecticut, United States

Author: Michael Southam

Astrophoto of the day from SPONLI, 02.12.2014