Category Archives: Sun online

Sun and solar activity 02.12.2014

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INFO FROM SIDC – RWC BELGIUM 2014 Dec 02 11:50:40 Solar activity is low. The strongest flare, out of 5 low-level C-class flares reported in the last 24 hours, was the impulsive C5.2 flare (peaking at 08:05 UT) on December 2. The flare originated from the Catania sunspot group 18 (NOAA AR 2217), and does not seem to be associated with CME (currently available data give no indication about possible on disc signatures of the CME). Catania sunspot groups 18 and 24 (NOAA ARs 2217 and 2222) maintain beta-gamma configuration of their photospheric magnetic field and could be the source of C-class flares. An isolated M-class flare is still possible from the Catania sunspot group 24 (NOAA AR 2222). No Earth directed CMEs were observed during last 24 hours.The Earth is currently inside a fast solar wind with the speed of about 550 km/s. This high speed stream which arrived on the midday of December 01, is associated with the extended low-latitude coronal hole (between N25 and N70) which reached the central meridian on the morning of November 26 (the transition of the coronal hole across the central meridian lasted more than two days). During last 24 hours the interplanetary magnetic field was slightly elevated, reaching the magnitude of about 12nT, but its current value decrease to about 5nT. The arrival of the coronal hole high speed stream resulted in the unsettled to active geomagnetic conditions (K=3 reported by Dourbes, K=4 reported by IZMIRAN and NOAA reported Kp=4) in the evening of December 1 and early morning of December 2. The geomagnetic conditions are at the moment quiet to unsettled and expected to remain so in the coming hours.

Sun online and solar activity 01.12.2014

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INFO FROM SIDC – RWC BELGIUM 2014 Dec 01 12:33:26 Several low-level C-class flares and one M-class flare were reported during last 24 hours. A long duration M1.8 flare, observed this morning, peaked at 06:41 UT. The M-class flare, as well as few C-class flares, originated from the Catania sunspot group 24 (NOAA AR 2222) which maintains beta-gamma configuration of its photospheric magnetic field. Currently available data give no indication about possible on disc signatures of the associated CME, therefore, we conclude that the M1.8 flare was most probably confined flare. Four out of ten currently numbered sunspot groups visible on the solar disc have beta-gamma configuration of their photospheric magnetic field and could be the source of the C-class flares and possible also an isolated M-class flare in the coming hours. No Earth directed CMEs were observed during last 24 hours.The Earth is currently inside a slow solar wind, with the speed of about 430 km/s. The interplanetary magnetic field is stable with the magnitude of about 5nT. The geomagnetic conditions are at the moment quiet to unsettled and expected to remain so in the following hours.

Sun online and solar activity 30.11.2014

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FAST WARNING ‘PRESTO’ MESSAGE from the SIDC (RWC-Belgium) 2014 Nov 30 18:52:51 The Presto alert message concerning the partial halo CME, first visible in LASCO/C2 on 28 November at 22:12UT, as reported by CACTus, is erroneous. This 220 degrees wide halo, stretching from the east side of the Sun over north to the west, is actually the result of a complex series of separate CMEs that occurred between noon on 28 November and the morning of 29 November. Most notable were a filament eruption west of the central meridian (afternoon of 28 November) and a prominence eruption at the northeast limb on 29 November around 02:00UT. At least 2 other CMEs were involved, but their source is uncertain. None of these CMEs had an Earth directed component.

 

Sun online and solar activity 26.11.2014

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INFO FROM SIDC – RWC BELGIUM 2014 Nov 26 12:25:23 Four C-class flare were observed, with NOAA 2217 producing the strongest event of the period (C2.9 peaking at 06:17UT). Slowly developing region NOAA 2219 and a new, currently unnumbered, region near the east limb merit some attention, as they were the sources of the other C-class flares. Numerous, but quiet, filaments are present on the solar disk, with the longest measuring 40 degrees and located in the NE quadrant. No Earth-directed CMEs were observed. Further C-class flaring is expected, with a small chance on an isolated M-class flare. Solar wind speed declined from about 400 to 320 km/s. Bz was mostly negative and varied between -6 and +4 nT. The IMF is directed away from the Sun. The geomagnetic field was quiet to unsettled (K<4), and is expected to remain so. Effects from an expected Sector Boundary Crossing and the possible high speed stream from the extension of a coronal hole may result in an isolated active period on 27-28 November.

Sun online and solar activity 24.11.2014

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INFO FROM SIDC – RWC BELGIUM 2014 Nov 24 12:16:19

Five low-level C-class flares were observed over the last 24 hours. The largest was a C4.1 peaking at 11:04UT in NOAA 2217, which was also the source of 3 other C2 flares. One of these peaked on 23 November at 16:14UT and was associated to a non-Earth directed CME, first visible in LASCO at 16:24UT. NOAA 2216 produced the remaining C2 flare. The other regions were quiet, with NOAA 2209 still maintaining a weak delta spot in its trailing portion. More C-class flares are expected, with a chance on an isolated M-class flare. The IMF is directed away from the Sun, with Bz varying between -7 and +4 nT. Solar wind speed varied between 470 and 360 km/s and is currently near 400 km/s. The geomagnetic field was quiet to unsettled (K<3), and is expected to remain so, with an isolated active period possible.

The Sun online and Solar Activity 23.11.2014

UPH20141124091421 INFO FROM SIDC – RWC BELGIUM 2014 Nov 23 12:43:20 NOAA ARs 2209 and 2216 (Catania numbers 9 and 14 respectively) have delta-spots in their trailing parts and continue to produce C-class flares. However, the strongest flare of the past 24 hours was the C3.5 flare peaking at 10:53 UT today in the still unnumbered sunspot group that appeared from behind the east solar limb yesterday evening. We expect flaring activity on the C-level, possibly with an isolated M-class flare. A long filament in the northern hemisphere has finished crossing the solar central meridian, but its eruption may still lead to an Earth-directed CME.The Earth is currently inside a slow (around 400 km/s) solar wind flow with slightly elevated (7-8 nT) interplanetary magnetic field magnitude. Due to low solar wind speed, the geomagnetic conditions remained mostly at the quiet to unsettled level (K < 4), only with one interval of active conditions (K = 4) reported by IZMIRAN and NOAA yesterday evening. The geomagnetic conditions are expected to stay at the quiet to unsettled levels (K < 4), with isolated intervals of active conditions (K = 4).

The Sun online and activity solar.31.10.2014

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During the past 24 hours, solar flaring activity was at the C-level, with a C9.7 as strongest flare. The background irradiation is decreasing as Catania group 88 (NOAA 2192) is rounding the west limb. Flares originated from Catania groups 88, 98 and 3 (NOAA 2192, 2200 and 2201 respectively). The C6.9 flare, originating from Catania group 3, peaked at 13:12 UT on October 30 and C2.3 flare, originating from Catania group 98, peaked at 15:03 UT. Both flares were accompanied by radio type II bursts and narrow eastward propagating CMEs. These CMEs will not have any impact on Earth. Due to the position of Catania group 88, we retain the warning condition for a proton event. The solar wind speed, observed by ACE, increased from 350  to 450 km/s, the interplanetary magnetic field went up in magnitude to about 12 nT and also the temperature increased. A northern coronal hole (extending from N10 to N55) has passed the central meridian and the associated high speed stream might arrive at the end of November 2. Quiet to active conditions are expected, with limited chances for minor storm conditions.

 

Equipment: Coronado 90 +  Imaging Source DMK  + LX75
Processing: Photoshop, Avistack 300 frames
Date: 31/10/14
Exposure 1/500 sec.

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The Sun online and activity solar.29.10.2014

солнце 29 октября

Solar activity has slightly reduced in the past 24 hours, with three M-class and two C-class flares. Activity mainly originated from  Catania sunspot group 88 (NOAA AR 2192). A narrow CME was observed in SOHO/LASCO-C2 imagery (first measurement at October 28 20:24 UT), with a projected speed of 388 km/s (CACTus estimate). The CME is travelling to the northeast of the Sun-Earth line. The CME is believed to be associated with activity at the backside of the Sun and as such no effect on Earth is expected. Catania group 88 still has potential to produce strong flares up to the X-level. Due to it’s location close to the West limb, a strong eruption may result in a rise of the proton flux. Earth is currently inside a slow solar wind, with solar wind speed decreasing from 450 km/s to currently around 350 km/s. The interplanetary magnetic field has a magnitude of about 5 nT with fluctuating Bz values. Quiet geomagnetic conditions are observed and are expected to continue.

The Sun online and activity solar.26.10.2014

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In the past 24 hours, Catania sunspot group 88 (NOAA AR 2192) produced two
X-class flares: X1.0 peaking at 17:08 UT yesterday and X2.0 peaking at
10:56 UT today. Neither of the flares seems to be associated with an
Earth-directed CME. The area of the Catania sunspot group 88 increases
again, and it maintains the beta-gamma-delta configuration of its
photospheric magnetic field, so we expect the flaring activity up to
X-level from this sunspot group. As the Catania sunspot group 88 is
currently situated in the western solar hemisphere, a major eruption in
this active region may lead to a proton event. A long filament in the
northern hemisphere is continuing its passage across the solar central
meridian. Its possible eruption may lead to an Earth-directed CME. The
Earth is currently inside a slow (around 370 km/s) solar wind flow with
slightly elevated (around 7 nT) interplanetary magnetic field magnitude.
The geomagnetic conditions are quiet and are expected to remain  so, with
isolated intervals of active (K = 4) geomagnetic conditions possible but
not very likely.

Equipment: Coronado 90 +  Imaging Source DMK  + LX75
Processing: Photoshop, Avistack 300 frames
Date: 26/10/14
Exposure 1/500 sec.

Observatory Sponli

The Sun online and activity solar.25.10.2014

 

 

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The strongest flare observed on the Sun during the past 24 hours was the X3.1 flare peaking at 21:41 UT yesterday in the Catania sunspot group 88 (NOAA AR 2192). SOHO/LASCO data demonstrate that the flare was accompanied only with a very weak and narrow CME. No geomagnetic consequences are expected. Despite the decrease in the area of the Catania sunspot group 88, it maintains the beta-gamma-delta configuration of its photospheric magnetic field, so we expect the flaring activity up to X-level from this sunspot group. As the Catania sunspot group 88 is currently situated close to the solar central meridian, a major eruption in this active region may lead to a geoeffective CME and a proton event. A long filament in the northern hemisphere is now crossing the solar central meridian. Its possible eruption may lead to an Earth-directed CME.The Earth is currently inside a slow (around 390 km/s) solar wind flow with average (around 5 nT) interplanetary magnetic field magnitude. The geomagnetic conditions are quiet and are expected to remain so.

Equipment: Coronado 90 +  Imaging Source DMK  + LX75
Processing: Photoshop, Avistack 300 frames
Date: 25/10/14
Exposure 1/500 sec.

Observatory Sponli