Tag Archives: Centaurus

IC 2944: Running Chicken Nebula

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IC 2944
, also known as the Running Chicken Nebula or the Lambda Cen Nebula, is an open cluster with an associated emission nebula found in the constellation Centaurus, near the star Lambda Centauri. It features Bok globules, which are frequently a site of active star formation. However, no evidence for star formation has been found in any of the globules in IC 2944.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Astro-Physics 152mm f/7.5 Starfire EDF
Imaging cameras: FLI ProLine Proline 16803
Mounts: Software Bisque Paramount MX
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Takahashi FS-60C
Guiding cameras: Starlight Xpress Superstar
Focal reducers: Astro-Physics AP 4.0″ Field Flattener
Software: PixInsight 1.8, FocusMax, Maxim DL Pro 5, Software Bisque TheSky6 Professional, Photoshop CS Photo Shop CS5, CCD Autopilot 5
Filters: Astrodon E-series LRGB Ha 5nm
Accessories: Sirius Dome
Dates: Jan. 28, 2014
Locations: Sydney Australia
Frames: 21×1200″
Integration: 7.0 hours

Author: David Nguyen
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 10 Aug 2014

Peculiar Elliptical Galaxy Centaurus A 

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Image Credit & Copyright: Roberto Colombari

 What’s happened to the center of this galaxy? Unusual and dramatic dust lanes run across the center of elliptical galaxy Centaurus A. These dust lanes are so thick they almost completely obscure the galaxy’s center in visible light. This is particularly unusual as Cen A’s red stars and round shape are characteristic of a giant elliptical galaxy, a galaxy type usually low in dark dust. Cen A, also known as NGC 5128, is also unusual compared to an average elliptical galaxy because it contains a higher proportion of young blue stars and is a very strong source of radio emission. Evidence indicates that Cen A is likely the result of the collision of twonormal galaxies. During the collision, many young stars were formed, but details of the creation of Cen A’s unusual dust belts are still being researched. Cen A lies only 13 million light years away, making it the closest active galaxy. Cen A, pictured above, spans 60,000 light years and can be seen with binoculars toward the constellation of Centaurus.

APOD NASA 30-Jun-14

Omega Globular Cluster

a165d0ee324d8b34db71360a7e65df9a.1824x0_q100_watermarkOmega Centauri (ω Cen) or NGC 5139, is a globular cluster in the constellation of Centaurus that was discovered by Edmond Halley in 1677. Located at a distance of 15,800 light-years (4,850 pc), it is the largest globular cluster in the Milky Way galaxy. Omega Centauri is so distinctive from the other galactic globular clusters that it is thought to have an alternate origin as the core remnant of a disrupted dwarf galaxy.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Intes Micro MN84
Imaging cameras: QSI 583 wsg
Mounts: Astro-Physics 1200 GTO
Guiding cameras: Starlight Xpress Lodestar
Filters: Astrodon RGB filter set
Dates: May 14, 2011
Frames: 36×300″
Integration: 3.0 hours

Author: Dean Salman

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI
19 April 2014

Centaurus A

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Centaurus A or NGC 5128 is a prominent galaxy in the constellation of Centaurus. It was discovered in 1826 by Scottish astronomerJames Dunlop from his home in Parramatta, in New South Wales, Australia. There is considerable debate in the literature regarding the galaxy’s fundamental properties such as its Hubble type (lenticular galaxy or a giant elliptical galaxy) and distance (10–16 million light-years). NGC 5128 is one of the closest radio galaxies to Earth, so its active galactic nucleus has been extensively studied by professional astronomers. The galaxy is also the fifth brightest in the sky, making it an ideal amateur astronomy target, although the galaxy is only visible from low northern latitudes and the southern hemisphere.

The center of the galaxy contains a supermassive black hole with a weight equivalent to 55 million solar masses, which ejects arelativistic jet that is responsible for emissions in the X-ray and radio wavelengths. By taking radio observations of the jet separated by a decade, astronomers have determined that the inner parts of the jet are moving at about one half of the speed of light. X-rays are produced farther out as the jet collides with surrounding gases resulting in the creation of highly energetic particles. The radio jets of Centaurus A are over a million light years long.

Like other starburst galaxies, a collision is suspected to be responsible for the intense burst of star formation. Spitzer Space Telescopestudies have confirmed that Centaurus A is colliding with and devouring a smaller spiral galaxy.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: TMB APO 480 f/6
Imaging cameras: Canon EOS 450D / Digital Rebel XSi / Kiss X2
Mounts: Vixen Atlux
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Rubinar 500/5,6
Guiding cameras: Lacerta MGEN
Software: DeepSkyStacker, Fitswork, photoshop
Filters: Baader IR EOS
Accessories: MGEN
Dates: July 27, 2011
Locations: Tivoli / Namibia
Frames: 9×300″ ISO800
Integration: 0.8 hours
Darks: ~9

Autor: Hartmuth Kintzel

06 March 2014

We select the best works of amateur astrophotographers with details of equipment, shooting processing etc.

IC 2944: Running Chicken Nebula

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IC 2944
, also known as the Running Chicken Nebula or the Lambda Cen Nebula, is an open cluster with an associated emission nebula found in the constellation Centaurus, near the star Lambda Centauri. It features Bok globules, which are frequently a site of active star formation. However, no evidence for star formation has been found in any of the globules in IC 2944.

The Hubble Space Telescope image on the right is a close up of a set of Bok globules discovered in IC 2944 by South African astronomerA. David Thackeray in 1950. These globules are now known as Thackeray’s Globules.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Canon EF 135mm f/2.0 L
Imaging cameras: Atik 314L+
Mounts: Celestron CG-5 Advanced GoTo
Filters: Orion HA OIII SII
Resolution: 1317×962
Dates: July 6, 2013
Frames: 30×240″

Autor: Rodrigo Andolfato

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI
10 December 2013

We select the best works of amateur astrophotographers with details of equipment, shooting processing etc.

Naked Eye Nova Centauri 2013

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Image Credit & Copyright: Yuri Beletsky (Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Institution)

Brightest stellar beacons of the constellation Centaurus, Alpha and Beta Centauri are easy to spot from the southern hemisphere. For now, so is new naked eye Nova Centauri 2013. In this night skyscape recorded near Las Campanas Observatory in the Chilean southern Atacama desert on December 5, the new star joins the old in the expansive constellation, seen at early morning hours through a greenish airglow. Caught by nova hunter John Seach from Australia on December 2 as it approached near naked eye brightness, Nova Cen 2013 has been spectroscopically identified as a classical nova, an interacting binary star system composed of a dense, hot white dwarf and cool, giant companion. Material from the companion star builds up as it falls onto the white dwarf’s surface triggering a thermonuclear event. The cataclysmic blast results in a drastic increase in brightness and an expanding shell of debris. The stars are not destroyed, though. Classical novae are thought to recur when the flow of material onto the white dwarf eventually resumes and produces another outburst.

APOD NASA 7-Dec-13