Tag Archives: Cigar Galaxy

Cigar Galaxy, Messier 82, NGC 3034

29.04

Messier 82 (also known as NGC 3034, Cigar Galaxy or M82) is a starburst galaxy about 12 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major. It is about five times more luminous than the whole Milky Way and one hundred times more luminous than our galaxy’s center. The starburst activity is thought to be triggered by interaction with neighboring galaxy M81, and M82 is a member of the M81 Group. As the closest starburst galaxy to our own, M82 is the prototypical example of this type of galaxy. SN 2014J, a Type Ia supernova, was observed in the galaxy on 21 January 2014,  see 2014 supernova. In 2014, in studying M82, scientists discovered the brightest pulsar yet known, designated M82 X-2.

Imaging cameras: Canon Hutech Modified 6D
Mounts: Astro-Physics AP 1600
Guiding cameras: Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2
Software: PixInsight,  Adobe Photoshop CC (64 Bit),  PHD2 Guiding
Accessories: Innovations Foresight On-axis guider XT
Resolution: 4336×2936
Dates: April 15, 2015
Frames: 49×600″
Integration: 8.2 hours
Avg. Moon age: 25.22 days
Avg. Moon phase: 19.64%
RA center: 148.978 degrees
DEC center: 69.682 degrees
Orientation: -136.916 degrees
Field radius: 0.252 degrees
Locations: Hangar Observatory at Bend Airport, Bend, Oregon, None
Author: John Hayes

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M82, Cigar Galaxy

8мар

Messier 82 (also known as NGC 3034, Cigar Galaxy or M82) is a starburst galaxy about 12 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major. It is about five times more luminous than the whole Milky Way and one hundred times more luminous than our galaxy’s center. The starburst activity is thought to be triggered by interaction with neighboring galaxy M81, and M82 is a member of the M81 Group. As the closest starburst galaxy to our own, M82 is the prototypical example of this type of galaxy. SN 2014J, a Type Ia supernova, was observed in the galaxy on 21 January 2014. In 2014, in studying M82, scientists discovered the brightest pulsar yet known, designated M82 X-2.

  • Imaging telescopes or lenses: SLOOH T2HM C14″ f/11
  • Imaging cameras: SBIG ST-10XME
  • Software: Pixinsight 1.8
  • Filters: Luminance,  Blue,  Green,  Red
  • Resolution: 3360×2612
  • Frames:
    Blue: 205×20″ -10C bin 3×3
    Green: 212×20″ -10C bin 3×3
    Luminance: 173×50″ -10C bin 2×2
    Red: 207×20″ ISO20 -10C bin 3×3
  • Integration: 5.9 hours
  • Darks: ~14
  • Bias: ~2
  • RA center: 148.987 degrees
  • DEC center: 69.696 degrees
  • Pixel scale: 0.233 arcsec/pixel
  • Orientation: 179.846 degrees
  • Field radius: 0.138 degrees
  • Locations: SLOOH Teide, Canary Islands, Mt. Teide, Canary Islands, Spain

Author: Peter Ilas

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Cigar Galaxy, M82

23янв

 

Messier 82 (also known as NGC 3034, Cigar Galaxy or M82) is a starburst galaxy about 12 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major. It is about five times more luminous than the whole Milky Way and one hundred times more luminous than our galaxy’s center. The starburst activity is thought to be triggered by interaction with neighboring galaxy M81, and M82 is a member of the M81 Group. As the closest starburst galaxy to our own, M82 is the prototypical example of this type of galaxy. SN 2014J, a Type Ia supernova, was observed in the galaxy on 21 January 2014. In 2014, in studying M82, scientists discovered the brightest pulsar yet known, designated M82 X-2.

M82 was previously believed to be an irregular galaxy. In 2005, however, two symmetric spiral arms were discovered in near-infrared (NIR) images of M82. The arms were detected by subtracting an axisymmetric exponential disk from the NIR images. Even though the arms were detected in NIR images, they are bluer than the disk. The arms were previously missed due to M82’s high disk surface brightness, our nearly edge-on view of this galaxy (~80°), and confusion by a complex network of dusty filaments in its optical images. These arms emanate from the ends of the NIR bar and can be followed for the length of 3 disc scales. Assuming that the northern part of M82 is nearer to us, as most of the literature does, the observed sense of rotation implies trailing arms.

  • Imaging telescopes or lenses: GSO RC12
  • Imaging cameras: Atik 4000
  • Mounts: Software Bisque Paramount MX
  • Guiding cameras: Lodestar
  • Focal reducers: AP CCDT67
  • Software: PixInsight
  • Filters: Baader Planetarium L 36mm,  Baader Planetarium B 36mm,  Baader Planetarium G 36mm,  Baader Planetarium R 36mm,  Baader Planetarium H-Alpha 7nm
  • Resolution: 2047×2047
  • Dates: Dec. 25, 2014,  Dec. 26, 2014,  Dec. 27, 2014,  Dec. 28, 2014,  Dec. 29, 2014
  • Frames:
    Baader Planetarium B 36mm: 13×450″ bin 2×2
    Baader Planetarium G 36mm: 13×450″ bin 2×2
    Baader Planetarium H-Alpha 7nm: 11×1800″ bin 1×1
    Baader Planetarium L 36mm: 62×900″ bin 1×1
    Baader Planetarium R 36mm: 13×450″ bin 2×2
  • Integration: 25.9 hours
  • Avg. Moon age: 5.45 days
  • Avg. Moon phase: 31.06%
  • RA center: 148.975 degrees
  • DEC center: 69.684 degrees
  • Pixel scale: 0.956 arcsec/pixel
  • Orientation: -3.604 degrees
  • Field radius: 0.384 degrees
  • Locations: Observatorio remoto Tomas Lopez en AstroCamp, Nerpio, Albacete, Spain

Author: Samuel

M82, Cigar Galaxy

d548f3640c5396e4143abf5f36a74f6a.1824x0_q100_watermark

Messier 82 (also known as NGC 3034, Cigar Galaxy or M82) is a starburst galaxy about 12 million light-years away in theconstellation Ursa Major. It is about five times more luminous than the whole Milky Way and one hundred times more luminous than our galaxy’s center. The starburst activity is thought to be triggered by interaction with neighboring galaxy M81, and M82 is a member of the M81 Group. As the closest starburst galaxy to our own, M82 is the prototypical example of this type of galaxy. SN 2014J, a Type Ia supernova, was observed in the galaxy on 21 January 2014.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Ian King Ikharos 8″ RC
Imaging cameras: Atik 460 EX
Mounts: Software Bisque Paramount MX
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Ian King Ikharos 8″ RC
Guiding cameras: Atik 314L+
Software: PixInsight, Software Bisque CCDSoft 5, Software Bisque TheSkyX, iLanga AstroPlanner, Matt Thomas’s CCDCommander
Filters: Baader H-alpha 7nm 36mm, Baader Luminance 36mm, Baader Red, Green, Blue 36mm
Accessories: Atik EFW2, Innovations Foresight On-axis guider
Dates: Dec. 18, 2013, Dec. 23, 2013
Frames:
Baader H-alpha 7nm 36mm: 25×900″ bin 2×2
Baader Luminance 36mm: 31×600″ bin 1×1
Baader Red, Green, Blue 36mm: 55×600″ bin 2×2
Integration: 20.6 hours

Author: Colin McGill
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 30 Sep 2014

Cigar Galaxy

38989a153b901f67088eb8ee5b92c14a.1824x0_q100_watermark_watermark_opacity-10_watermark_position-6_watermark_text-Copyright Marco Bocchini
Messier 82 (also known as NGC 3034Cigar Galaxy or M82) is a starburst galaxy about 12 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major. It is about five times more luminous than the whole Milky Way and one hundred times more luminous than our galaxy’s center. The starburst activity is thought to be triggered by interaction with neighboring galaxy M81, and M82 is a member of the M81 Group. As the closest starburst galaxy to our own, M82 is the prototypical example of this type of galaxy. SN 2014J, a Type Ia supernova, was observed in the galaxy on 21 January 2014.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Meade 10″ LX 200 ACF
Imaging cameras: Moravian G2-8300FW Moravian 8300
Mounts: Gemini g53F Gemini
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Meade 10″ LX 200 ACF
Guiding cameras: MagZero QHY5L-IIm
Software: PixInsight PinInsight 1.8
Filters: Astronomik LRGB 31 mm
Dates: Feb. 24, 2014
Frames:
Astronomik LRGB 31 mm: 11×900″ -30C bin 1×1
Astronomik LRGB 31 mm: 12×600″ -30C bin 2×2
Integration: 4.8 hours

Author: Marco Bocchini
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 17 Sep 2014

Cigar Galaxy

d548f3640c5396e4143abf5f36a74f6a.1824x0_q100_watermark

M 82 (also known as NGC 3034Cigar Galaxy) is the prototype nearby starburst galaxy about 12 million light-yearsaway in the constellation Ursa Major. The starburst galaxy is five times more luminous than the whole Milky Way and one hundred times more luminous than our galaxy’s center. The starburst activity is thought to be triggered by interaction with neighboring galaxy M81, and M82 is a member of the M81 Group.

 

SN 2014J, an apparent Type Ia supernova, was observed in the galaxy on 21 January 2014.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Ian King Ikharos 8″ RC
Imaging cameras: Atik 460 EX
Mounts: Software Bisque Paramount MX
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Ian King Ikharos 8″ RC
Guiding cameras: Atik 314L+
Software: PixInsight, Software Bisque CCDSoft 5, Software Bisque TheSkyX, iLanga AstroPlanner, Matt Thomas’s CCDCommander
Filters: Baader H-alpha 7nm 36mm, Baader Luminance 36mm, Baader Red, Green, Blue 36mm
Accessories: Atik EFW2, Innovations Foresight On-axis guider
Dates: Dec. 18, 2013, Dec. 23, 2013
Frames: 
Baader H-alpha 7nm 36mm: 25×900″ bin 2×2
Baader Luminance 36mm: 31×600″ bin 1×1
Baader Red, Green, Blue 36mm: 55×600″ bin 2×2
Integration: 20.6 hours

Author: Colin McGill
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 03 July 2014

Bright Supernova in M82

M82SN_ArrowBlock
Image Credit & Copyright: Adam Block, Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter, U. Arizona

Astronomers really don’t find supernovae by looking for the arrows. But in this image taken January 23rd, an arrow does point to an exciting, new supernova, now cataloged as SN 2014J, in nearby bright galaxy M82. Located near the Big Dipper in planet Earth’s sky, M82 is also known as the Cigar Galaxy, a popular target for telescopes in the northern hemisphere. In fact, SN 2014J was first spotted as an unfamiliar sourcein the otherwise familiar galaxy by teaching fellow Steve Fossey and astronomy workshop students Ben Cooke, Tom Wright, Matthew Wilde and Guy Pollack at the University College London Observatory on the evening of January 21. M82 is a mere 12 million light-years away (so the supernova explosion did happen 12 million years ago, that light just now reaching Earth), making supernova SN 2014J one of the closest to be seen in recent decades. Spectra indicate it is a Type Ia supernova caused by the explosion of a white dwarf accreting matter from a companion star. By some estimates two weeks away from its maximum brightness, SN 2014J is already the brightest part of M82 and visible in small telescopes in the evening sky.

NASA APOD 24-Jan-2014