Tag Archives: Draco

NGC 5907

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NGC 5907 is a spiral galaxy located approximately 50 million light years from Earth. It has an anomalously low metallicity and few detectable giant stars, being apparently composed almost entirely of dwarf stars. It is a member of the NGC 5866 Group.
NGC 5907 has long been considered a prototypical example of a warped spiral in relative isolation. Then in 2006, an international team of astronomers announced the presence of an extended tidal stream surrounding the galaxy that challenges this picture and suggests the gravitational perturbations induced by the stream progenitor may be the cause for the warp.
NGC 5907 is also known at the Knife Edge or Splinter galaxy.
The galaxy was discovered in 1788 by William Herschel. Supernova 1940A was in this galaxy.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Ian King Ikharos 8″ RC
Imaging cameras: Atik 460 EX
Mounts: Software Bisque Paramount MX
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Ian King Ikharos 8″ RC
Guiding cameras: Atik 314L+
Software: PixInsight, Software Bisque CCDSoft 5, Software Bisque TheSkyX, iLanga AstroPlanner, Matt Thomas’s CCDCommander
Filters: Baader Luminance 36mm, Baader Red, Green, Blue 36mm
Accessories: Atik EFW2, Innovations Foresight On-axis guider
Dates: May 22, 2014
Frames: 103×600″
Integration: 17.2 hours

Author: Colin McGill
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 29 Sep 2014

Arp 188 and the Tadpole’s Tail 

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Image Credit: 
Hubble Legacy Archive, ESA, NASA; Processing & Copyright: Joachim Dietrich


Why does this galaxy have such a long tail? In this stunning vista, based on image data from the Hubble Legacy Archive, distant galaxies form a dramatic backdrop for disrupted spiral galaxy Arp 188, the Tadpole Galaxy. The cosmic tadpole is a mere 420 million light-years distant toward the northern constellation Draco. Its eye-catching tail is about 280 thousand light-years long and features massive, bright blue star clusters. One story goes that a more compact intruder galaxy crossed in front of Arp 188 – from right to left in this view – and was slung around behind the Tadpole by their gravitational attraction. During the close encounter, tidal forces drew out the spiral galaxy’s stars, gas, and dust forming the spectacular tail. The intruder galaxy itself, estimated to lie about 300 thousand light-years behind the Tadpole, can be seen through foreground spiral arms at the upper right. Following its terrestrial namesake, the Tadpole Galaxy will likely lose its tail as it grows older, the tail’s star clusters forming smaller satellites of the large spiral galaxy.

APOD NASA 25-Aug-14

NGC 4236 in Draco

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NGC 4236 (also known as Caldwell 3) is a barred spiral galaxy located in the constellation DracoNGC 4236 is a member of the M81 Group, a group of galaxies located at a distance of approximately 11.7 Mly (3.6 Mpc) from Earth. The group also contains the well-known spiral galaxy Messier 81 and the well-known starburst galaxy Messier 82.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: AG Optical 12.5 IDK
Imaging cameras: Apogee U16M
Mounts: Paramount MX
Filters: Astrodon E-series LRGB
Dates: March 31, 2014
Locations: New Mexico Skies
Frames: 55×900″
Integration: 13.8 hours

Author: Mike Miller
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 26 July 2014

NGC 4236 in Draco

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NGC 4236
 (also known as Caldwell 3) is a barred spiral galaxy located in the constellation Draco. NGC 4236 is a member of the M81 Group, a group of galaxies located at a distance of approximately 11.7 Mly (3.6 Mpc) from Earth. The group also contains the well-known spiral galaxy Messier 81 and the well-known starburst galaxy Messier 82.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Orion Optics UK CT8
Imaging cameras: SBIG ST-8300C, SBIG ST-8300M
Mounts: Losmandy G11
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Orion Optics UK CT8
Guiding cameras: Starlight Xpress Lodestar guide camera
Focal reducers: Baader Planetarium RCC
Software: Maxim DL, photoshop
Filters: Hutech IDAS LPS-P2
Accessories: Celestron Radial Guider
Dates: May 6, 2014
Frames: Hutech IDAS LPS-P2: 40×600″ bin 1×1
Integration: 6.7 hours

Author: Jacek Bobowik
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 29 June 2014

Arp 81: 100 Million Years Later 

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Image Credit: Hubble Legacy Archive, ESA, NASA; Processing – Martin Pugh

From planet Earth, we see this strongly distorted pair of galaxies, cataloged as Arp 81, as they were only about 100 million years after their close encounter. The havoc wreaked by their mutual gravitational interaction during the encounter is detailed in this color composite image showing twisted streams of gas and dust, a chaos of massive star formation, and a tidal tail stretching for 200 thousand light-years or so as it sweeps behind the cosmic wreckage. Also known as NGC 6622 (left) and NGC 6621, the galaxies are roughly equal in size but are destined to merge into one large galaxy in the distant future, making repeated approaches until they finally coalesce. Located in the constellation Draco, the galaxies are 280 million light-years away. Even more distant background galaxies can be spotted in this sharp, reprocessed, image from Hubble Legacy Archive data.

NASA APOD 23-Apr-2014