Tag Archives: Globular Cluster

Globular Cluster M 13

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Messier 13 (M13), also designated NGC 6205 and sometimes called the Great Globular Cluster in Hercules or the Hercules Globular Cluster, is a globular cluster of about 300,000 stars in the constellation of Hercules.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Astro-Tech AT65EDQ
Imaging cameras: Atik 414EX Mono
Mounts: Celestron AVX
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Astro-Tech AT72ED
Guiding cameras: Orion Star Shoot Autoguider Pro
Software: PixInsight 1.8,  PHD2 Guiding Software
Filters: Baader LRGB 1.25” Filters
Accessories: Atik Manual Filter Wheel
Resolution: 1358×1009
Dates: April 16, 2015
Frames:
Baader Planetarium 1.25″ B: 9×300″ -15C
Baader Planetarium 1.25″ G: 9×300″ -15C
Baader Planetarium 1.25″ R: 9×300″ -15C
Integration: 2.2 hours
Avg. Moon age: 26.34 days
Avg. Moon phase: 11.06%
RA center: 250.440 degrees
DEC center: 36.464 degrees
Orientation: 90.448 degrees
Field radius: 0.739 degrees

Author: Mike Kline

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Globular cluster M56 in Lyra

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 M56 (or aka NGC 6779) is a globular cluster in the constellation Lyra. It was discovered by Charles Messieron January 19, 1779. The cluster is located almost midway along an imaginary line between Albireo (β Cygni) and Sulafat (γ Lyrae). It is a challenge to find with large (50–80 mm) binoculars, appearing as a slightly fuzzy star. The cluster can be resolved using a telescope with an aperture of 8 in (20 cm) or larger.

M56 is at a distance of about 32,900 light-years from Earth and measures roughly 84 light-years across, with a combined mass some 230,000 times that of the Sun. It is about 31–32 kly (9.5–9.8 kpc) from the Galactic Center and 4.8 kly (1.5 kpc) above thegalactic plane. This cluster has an estimated age of 13.70 billion years and is following a retrograde orbit through the Milky Way. The properties of this cluster suggest that it may have been acquired during the merger of a dwarf galaxy, of which Omega Centauriforms the surviving nucleus. For Messier 56, the abundance of elements other than hydrogen and helium, what astronomers term themetallicity, has a very low value of [Fe/H] = –2.00 dex. This is equivalent to 1% of the abundance in the Sun.

The brightest stars in M56 are of 13th magnitude, while it contains only about a dozen known variable stars, such as V6 (RV Tauri star; period: 90 days) or V1 (Cepheid: 1.510 days); other variable stars are V2 (irregular) and V3 (semiregular). In 2000, a diffuse X-ray emission was tentatively identified coming from the vicinity of the cluster. This is most likely interstellar medium that has been heated by the passage of the cluster through the galactic halo. The relative velocity of the cluster is about 177 km s−1, which is sufficient to heat the medium in its wake to a temperature of 940,000 K.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Meade Model 2080
Imaging cameras: Canon 600D
Mounts: Sky-Watcher HEQ5 PRO
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Celestron 80mm Guidescope
Guiding cameras: Sky-Watcher Synguider
Software: PixInsight, BinaryRivers BackyardEOS
Dates: Sept. 27, 2013
Locations: Borås, Sweden
Frames: 15×240″ ISO800
Integration: 1.0 hours
Darks: ~20
Flats: ~20
Bias: ~20

Author: Peter Folkesson

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI
22 May 2014

Globular cluster M13

7cfe24d22bc09c4c8dbf1b6e16c181ed.1824x0_q100_watermark_watermark_opacity-10_watermark_position-6_watermark_text-© Peter Folkesson
Messier 13 (M13), also designated NGC 6205 and sometimes called the Great Globular Cluster in Hercules or the Hercules Globular Cluster, is a globular cluster of about 300,000 stars in the constellation of Hercules.

M13 is about 145 light-years in diameter, and it is composed of several hundred thousand stars, the brightest of which is the variable star V11 with an apparent magnitude of 11.95. M13 is 25,100 light-years away from Earth.
The Arecibo message of 1974, containing encoded information about the human race, DNA, atomic numbers, Earth’s position, and other information, was beamed towards M13 to allow it to be picked up by potential extraterrestrial civilizations in the cluster. The message will reach the cluster in 25,000 years.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Meade Model 2080
Imaging cameras: Canon 600D
Mounts: Sky-Watcher HEQ5 PRO
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Celestron 80mm Guidescope
Guiding cameras: Sky-Watcher Synguider
Focal reducers: Meade f/6.3
Software: PixInsight, BinaryRivers BackyardEOS
Dates: Aug. 25, 2013
Locations: Roof terrace, Borås, Sweden
Frames:
10×120″ ISO800
10×180″ ISO800
12×60″ ISO800
Integration: 1.0 hours
Darks: ~10
Flats: ~16
Bias: ~20

Author: Peter Folkesson

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI
19 May 2014

M13: Great Cluster in Hercules

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Messier 13 (M13), also designated NGC 6205 and sometimes called the Great Globular Cluster in Hercules or the Hercules Globular Cluster, is a globular cluster of about 300,000 stars in the constellation of Hercules. M13 is about 145 light-years in diameter, and it is composed of several hundred thousand stars, the brightest of which is the variable star V11 with an apparent magnitude of 11.95. M13 is 25,100 light-years away from Earth.

M13 was discovered by Edmond Halley in 1714, and catalogued by Charles Messier on June 1, 1764. It is located at right ascension 16h 41.7m and declination +36° 28′. With an apparent magnitude of 5.8, it is barely visible with the naked eye on a very clear night. Its diameter is about 23 arc minutes and it is readily viewable in small telescopes. Nearby is NGC 6207, a 12th magnitude edge-on galaxy that lies 28 arc minutes directly north east. A small galaxy, IC 4617, lies halfway between NGC 6207 and M13, north-northeast of the large globular cluster’s center.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: AT6RC
Imaging cameras: Canon EOS 1000D / Rebel XS
Mounts: Orion Atlas EQ-G
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Orion Mini Guide Scope
Guiding cameras: Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager & Autoguider
Focal reducers: TeleVue 0.8x
Software: DeepSkyStacker, PHD guiding, photoshop, Canon EOS
Accessories: DIY thermoelectric camera cooler
Dates: June 9, 2012
Locations: Elkins, WV
Frames:
23×240″ ISO1600
50×60″ ISO1600
Integration: 2.4 hours

Autor: Mike Carroll

09 March 2014

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