Tag Archives: IC 434

The Horsehead Nebula, IC 434

26дек
The Horsehead Nebula (also known as Barnard 33 in emission nebula IC 434) is a dark nebula in the constellation Orion. The nebula is located just to the south of the star Alnitak, which is farthest east on Orion’s Belt, and is part of the much larger Orion Molecular Cloud Complex. The nebula was first recorded in 1888 by Scottish astronomer Williamina Fleming on photographic plate B2312 taken at the Harvard College Observatory. The Horsehead Nebula is approximately 1500 light years from Earth. It is one of the most identifiable nebulae because of the shape of its swirling cloud of dark dust and gases, which bears some resemblance to a horse’s head when viewed from Earth.

The dark cloud of dust and gas is a region in the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex where star formation is taking place. This stellar nursery, as it is known, can contain over 100 known organic and inorganic gases as well as dust consisting of large and complex organic molecules.
Imaging telescopes or lenses: TS APO80
Imaging cameras: QSI 660wsg-8
Mounts: Orion HDX110 EQ-G
Guiding telescopes or lenses: TS APO80
Guiding cameras: Starlight Xpress Loadestar X2
Focal reducers: TS Optics TS Flat 2
Software: Cyanogen Maxim DL 6 Pro, Pixinsight 1.8
Filters: Astrodon Ha 5nm, Astrodon LRGB
Resolution: 1881×1497
Dates: Nov. 23, 2014, Dec. 12, 2014
Astrodon Ha 5nm: 23×900″
Astrodon LRGB: 70×300″ -30C
Integration: 11.6 hours
Avg. Moon age: 10.19 days
Avg. Moon phase: 36.66%
RA center: 85.292 degrees
DEC center: -2.188 degrees
Orientation: 87.220 degrees
Field radius: 0.937 degrees
Locations: Home observatory, Tbilisi, Georgia

Author: David Dvali

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Horsehead Nebula

21 ноября

The Horsehead Nebula (also known as Barnard 33 in emission nebula IC 434) is a dark nebula in the constellation Orion.[1] The nebula is located just to the south of the star Alnitak, which is farthest east on Orion’s Belt, and is part of the much larger Orion Molecular Cloud Complex. The nebula was first recorded in 1888 by Scottish astronomer Williamina Fleming on photographic plate B2312 taken at the Harvard College Observatory. The Horsehead Nebula is approximately 1500 light years from Earth. It is one of the most identifiable nebulae because of the shape of its swirling cloud of dark dust and gases, which bears some resemblance to ahorse’s head when viewed from Earth.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: William Optics Zenithstar ED 70 William Optics
Imaging cameras: Canon EOS 400D mod.Baader
Mounts: Skywatcher EQ-3 – 2
Focal reducers: TV 0,8x
Software: Gimp, DSS, Fitswork
Filters: Baader Ha OIII SII Halpha
Resolution: 848×594
Dates: Oct. 30, 2014
Frames: 1×300″
Integration: 0.1 hours
Avg. Moon age: 6.19 days
Avg. Moon phase: 37.43%
RA center: 85.068 degrees
DEC center: -2.329 degrees
Pixel scale: 11.093 arcsec/pixel
Orientation: 168.055 degrees
Field radius: 1.595 degrees

Аuthor: MarcinSn

Аstrophotography of the day of SPONLI, 21.11.2014

Nebulae in Orion

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The Horsehead Nebula (also known as Barnard 33 in emission nebula IC 434) is a dark nebula in the constellation Orion. The nebula is located just to the south of the star Alnitak, which is farthest east on Orion’s Belt, and is part of the much larger Orion Molecular Cloud Complex.
The reflection nebula NGC 2023 is in the constellation Orion. It is one of the brightest sources of fluorescent molecular hydrogen, and at 4 light-years wide it is one of the largest in the sky. It is powered by the B star (B1.5) HD 37903, the most luminous member of a cluster of young stellar objects illuminating the front surface of the Lynds 1630 molecular cloud (Barnard 33) in Orion B.

The Flame Nebula, designated as NGC 2024 and Sh2-277, is an emission nebula in the constellation Orion. It is about 900 to 1,500light-years away. The bright star Alnitak (ζ Ori), the easternmost star in the Belt of Orion, shines energetic ultraviolet light into the Flame and this knocks electrons away from the great clouds of hydrogen gas that reside there.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Takahashi TSA 102 f/8
Imaging cameras: Canon EOS 1000D / Rebel XS
Mounts: Takahashi EM-400 Temma2
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Lunatico EZG60
Guiding cameras: QHYCCD QHY5
Software: PHD guiding, PixInsight, Bahtinov Grabber
Filters: Astronomik CLS CCD clip in
Dates: Feb. 12, 2012
Frames: Astronomik CLS CCD clip in: 12×600″ ISO800
Integration: 2.0 hours
Darks: ~20
Flats: ~20
Bias: ~20

Author: Alberto Pisabarro
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 15 Aug 2014

Horsehead Nebula IC 434

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The Horsehead Nebula (also known as Barnard 33 in emission nebula IC 434) is a dark nebula in the constellation Orion. The nebula is located just to the south of the star Alnitak, which is farthest east on Orion’s Belt, and is part of the much larger Orion Molecular Cloud Complex. The nebula was first recorded in 1888 by Scottish astronomer Williamina Fleming on photographic plate B2312 taken at the Harvard College Observatory. The Horsehead Nebula is approximately 1500 light years from Earth. It is one of the most identifiable nebulae because of the shape of its swirling cloud of dark dust and gases, which bears some resemblance to ahorse’s head when viewed from Earth.

The dark cloud of dust and gas is a region in the Orion Nebula where star formation is taking place. This stellar nursery, as it is known, can contain over 100 known organic and inorganic gases as well as dust consisting of large and complex organic molecules.

The red or pinkish glow originates from hydrogen gas predominantly behind the nebula, ionized by the nearby bright star Sigma Orionis. Magnetic fields channel the gases leaving the nebula into streams, shown as streaks in the background glow. A glowing strip of hydrogen gas marks the edge of the massive cloud and the densities of stars are noticeably different on either side.

The heavy concentrations of dust in the Horsehead Nebula region and neighbouring Orion Nebula are localized, resulting in alternating sections of nearly complete opacity and transparency. The darkness of the Horsehead is caused mostly by thick dust blocking the light of stars behind it. The lower part of the Horsehead’s neck casts a shadow to the left. The visible dark nebula emerging from the gaseous complex is an active site of the formation of “low-mass” stars. Bright spots in the Horsehead Nebula’s base are young stars just in the process of forming.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Sky-Watcher Newton 8″
Imaging cameras: Canon EOS 550D / Rebel T2i
Mounts: Sky-Watcher HEQ5
Focal reducers: Sky-Watcher Coma corrector
Software: DeepSkyStacker, PHD guiding, photoshop
Dates: Oct. 20, 2012
Frames: 20×600″
Integration: 3.3 hours

Author: Ivan Jevremovic
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 09 July 2014