Tag Archives: Lagoon nebula

Trifid Nebula, Lagoon nebula, and NGC 6559 in Sagittarius

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Imaging telescopes or lenses: Takahashi Epsilon 180ED
Imaging cameras: Canon EOS 5D Mark II MOD
Mounts: Takahashi EM-400 Temma2
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Vixen FL70S
Guiding cameras: Fishcamp Starfish
Software: DeepSkyStacker, Adobe Photoshop CS3, Auriga Imaging RegiStar
Filters: Infrared 825 nm , UV/IR-cut
Dates: June 26, 2012
Locations: Mt. Ho-Huan (Taiwan)
Frames:
Infrared 825 nm : 12×300″ ISO1600
UV/IR-cut: 16×180″ ISO800
Integration: 1.8 hours

Autor: Wei-Hao Wang

27 February 2014

We select the best works of amateur astrophotographers with details of equipment, shooting processing etc.

The Lagoon Nebula in the constellation Sagittarius

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The Lagoon Nebula is estimated to be between 4,000-6,000 light years from the Earth. In the sky of Earth, it spans 90′ by 40′, translates to an actual dimension of 110 by 50 light years. Like many nebulas, it appears pink in time-exposure color photos but is gray to the eye peering through binoculars or a telescope, human vision having poor color sensitivity at low light levels. The nebula contains a number ofBok globules (dark, collapsing clouds of protostellar material), the most prominent of which have been catalogued by E. E. Barnard as B88, B89 and B296. It also includes a funnel-like or tornado-like structure caused by a hot O-type star that emanates ultraviolet light, heating and ionizing gases on the surface of the nebula.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Takahashi TOA-130
Imaging cameras: SBIG STL-11000
Mounts: Losmandy G11
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Orion ShortTube 80 f/5
Guiding cameras: Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager & Autoguider
Filters: Astrodon Red, Astrodon G, Astrodon Filter: Blue, Astrodon h-Alpha
Dates: Aug. 14, 2012
Frames:
Astrodon G: 3×600″ -15C bin 1×1
Astrodon h-Alpha: 7×900″ -15C bin 1×1
Astrodon Filter: Blue: 3×600″ -15C bin 1×1
Astrodon Red: 3×600″ -15C bin 1×1

Autor: Maurizio Cabibbo

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI

06 February 2014

We select the best works of amateur astrophotographers with details of equipment, shooting processing etc.

Lagoon Nebula and Trifid Nebula (Hubble Palette)

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Lagoon Nebula (down) Trifid Nebula (up)  in the constellation Sagittarius.
The Lagoon Nebula is estimated to be between 4,000-6,000 light years from the Earth. In the sky of Earth, it spans 90′ by 40′, translates to an actual dimension of 110 by 50 light years. Like many nebulas, it appears pink in time-exposure color photos but is gray to the eye peering through binoculars or a telescope, human vision having poor color sensitivity at low light levels.  The Trifid Nebula was the subject of an investigation by astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope in 1997, using filters that isolate emission from hydrogen atoms, ionized sulfur atoms, and doubly ionized oxygen atom. The images were combined into a false-color composite picture to suggest how the nebula might look to the eye.

Camera : SBIG STF-8300M (cooled at-5C)
Telescope/Lens : Takahashi FSQ-85ED (450mm f/5.3)
Filter : Astrodon Ha, SII, OIII
Tracking Mount : Takahashi EM-11
Autoguide : SBIG SG-4

Total Exposure Time : Ha-72mins, SII-105mins, OIII-75mins
w Dark Frames, Bias Frames
process w CCD stack,PI, PS5

Autor: Vincent Vegabort

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI
6 January 2014

We select the best works of amateur astrophotographers with details of equipment, shooting processing etc.

The Lagoon Nebula

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The Lagoon Nebula (catalogued as Messier 8 or M8, and as NGC 6523) is a giant interstellar cloud in the constellation Sagittarius. It is classified as an emission nebula and as an H II region.

The Lagoon Nebula was discovered by Giovanni Hodierna before 1654 and is one of only two star-forming nebulae faintly visible to the naked eye from mid-northern latitudes. Seen with binoculars, it appears as a distinct oval cloudlike patch with a definite core. A fragile star cluster appears superimposed on it.

Autor: Jean-Marie Locci

20 December 2013

We select the best works of amateur astrophotographers with details of equipment, shooting processing etc.

M8: Lagoon nebula

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Scope: FLT110 apo & F/F type4 @ f/5.6

Camera: canon 40D modified
Mount: NEQ6 pro with autoguider
Exposure: 12*5min iso 1000
Autor: Mohammad Nouroozi

The Lagoon Nebula (catalogued as Messier 8 or M8, and as NGC 6523) is a giant interstellar cloud in the constellation Sagittarius. It is classified as an emission nebula and as an H II region.

The Lagoon Nebula was discovered by Giovanni Hodierna before 1654[4] and is one of only two star-forming nebulae faintly visible to the naked eye from mid-northern latitudes. Seen with binoculars, it appears as a distinct oval cloudlike patch with a definite core. A fragile star cluster appears superimposed on it.
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI
December 04, 2013
We select the best works of amateur astrophotographers with details of equipment, shooting processing etc.

Lagoon nebula in Sagittarius

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Red zone shows the area of hydrogen and yellow – oxygen.
The Lagoon Nebula was discovered by Giovanni Hodierna before 1654 and is one of only two star-forming nebulae faintly visible to the naked eye from mid-northern latitudes. Seen with binoculars, it appears as a distinct oval cloudlike patch with a definite core. A fragile star cluster appears superimposed on it. The Lagoon Nebula is estimated to be between 4,000-6,000 light years from the Earth. In the sky of Earth, it spans 90′ by 40′, translates to an actual dimension of 110 by 50 light years.

Telescope: Orion 190mm Maksutov Newtonian
Mount: Losmandy G-11
Camera: QHY9
Filters: Astrodon emission lines Ha, OIII, SII
Exposure time: 6 hours

Autor: project participant Maurice De Castro (Dominican Republic)

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI
December 03, 2013

We select the best works of amateur astrophotographers with details of equipment, shooting processing etc.