Tag Archives: M16

M16 Eagle Nebula

27янвThe Eagle Nebula (catalogued as Messier 16 or M16, and as NGC 6611, and also known as the Star Queen Nebula and The Spire) is a young open cluster of stars in the constellation Serpens, discovered by Jean-Philippe de Cheseaux in 1745-46. Its name derives from its shape that is thought to resemble an eagle. It contains several active star-forming gas and dust regions, including the famous “Pillars of Creation”, photographed by the Hubble Space Telescope.

The Eagle Nebula is part of a diffuse emission nebula, or H II region, which is catalogued as IC 4703. This region of active current star formation is about 7000 light-years distant. The tower of gas that can be seen coming off the nebula is approximately 9.5 light-years or about 90 trillion kilometers long.

The brightest star in the nebula (HD 168076) has an apparent magnitude of +8.24, easily visible with good binoculars. It is actually a binary star formed of an O3.5V star plus an O7.5V companion.

The cluster associated with the nebula has approximately 460 stars, the brightest of spectral class O, a mass of roughly 80 solar masses, and a luminosity up to 1 million times that of the Sun. Its age has been estimated to be 1–2 million years. The descriptive names reflect impressions of the shape of the central pillar rising from the southeast into the central luminous area. The name “Star Queen Nebula” was introduced by Robert Burnham, Jr., reflecting his characterization of the central pillar as the Star Queen shown in silhouette.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Takahashi FSQ106
Imaging cameras: Atik 460 EX Mono
Mounts: Vixen New Atlux
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Takahashi FSQ106
Guiding cameras: QHY5L-II-M 5L-II M
Software: PHD Lab PhD Guiding 2, Main Sequence Software SequenceGeneratorPro, PixInsight
Filters: Astrodon Narrowband 3mn (Ha, OIII, SII, NII)
Accessories: Atik OAG, Atik EFW2 Filter Wheel
Resolution: 2675×2055
Dates: Aug. 3, 2013
Frames: 37×1800″
Integration: 18.5 hours
Avg. Moon age: 26.00 days
Avg. Moon phase: 13.48%
RA center: 274.745 degrees
DEC center: -13.900 degrees
Pixel scale: 1.764 arcsec/pixel
Orientation: 154.720 degrees
Field radius: 0.826 degrees
Locations: Bilgebay Observatory, Mugla, Marmaris, Turkey

Author: Bilgebay

A Sagittarius Starscape 

M16M17M18M24M25RGBHa_5panel_Hancock
Image Credit & Copyright: Terry Hancock (Down Under Observatory)

 This rich starscape spans nearly 7 degrees on the sky, toward the Sagittarius spiral arm and the center of our Milky Way galaxy. A telescopic mosaic, it features well-known bright nebulae and star clusterscataloged by 18th century cosmic tourist Charles Messier. Still popular stops for skygazers M16, the Eagle (far right), and M17, the Swan (near center) nebulae are the brightest star-forming emission regions. With wingspans of 100 light-years or so, they shine with the telltale reddish glow of hydrogen atoms from over 5,000 light-years away. Colorful open star cluster M25 near the upper left edge of the scene is closer, a mere 2,000 light-years distant and about 20 light-years across. M24, also known as the Sagittarius Star Cloud, crowds in just left of center along the bottom of the frame, fainter and more distant Milky Way stars seen through a narrow window in obscuring fields of interstellar dust.

APOD NASA 05-Sep-14

Eagle Nebula in Serpens

a7f826aad03d94aefe9a34a02aafb3cd.1824x0_q100_watermark_watermark_opacity-15_watermark_position-1_watermark_text-Copyright Michael Miller
The Eagle Nebula is part of a diffuse emission nebula, or H II region, which is catalogued as IC 4703. This region of active current star formation is about 7000 light-years distant. The tower of gas that can be seen coming off the nebula is approximately 9.5 light-years or about 90 trillion kilometers long.

The brightest star in the nebula (HD 168076) has an apparent magnitude of +8.24, easily visible with good binoculars. It is actually abinary star formed of an O3.5V star plus an O7.5V companion.
The cluster associated with the nebula has approximately 460 stars, the brightest of spectral class O, a mass of roughly 80 solar masses, and a luminosity up to 1 million times that of the Sun. Its age has been estimated to be 1–2 million years.
The descriptive names reflect impressions of the shape of the central pillar rising from the southeast into the central luminous area. The name “Star Queen Nebula” was introduced by Robert Burnham, Jr., reflecting his characterization of the central pillar as the Star Queen shown in silhouette.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: AG Optical 12.5 IDK
Mounts: Paramount MX
Software: photoshop, DC-3 Dreams ACP, PixInsight PixInsinght 1.8 RC7, Maxim DL
Filters: Astrodon H-alpha 5nm, Astrodon E-series LRGB
Dates: June 18, 2014
Locations: New Mexico Skies

Author: Mike Miller
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 22 July 2014

M16 and the Eagle Nebula 

 

m16_32block
Image Credit & Copyright: Adam Block, Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter, Univ. Arizona
 

A star cluster around 2 million years young, M16 is surrounded by natal clouds of dust and glowing gas also known as The Eagle Nebula. This beautifully detailed image of the region includes cosmic sculptures made famous in Hubble Space Telescope close-ups of the starforming complex. Described as elephant trunks or Pillars of Creation, dense, dusty columns rising near the center are light-years in length but are gravitationally contracting to form stars. Energetic radiation from the cluster stars erodes material near the tips, eventually exposing the embedded new stars. Extending from the left edge of the frame is another dusty starforming column known as the Fairy of Eagle Nebula. M16 and the Eagle Nebula lie about 7,000 light-years away, an easy target for binoculars or small telescopes in a nebula rich part of the sky toward the split constellation Serpens Cauda (the tail of the snake).

NASA APOD 07-Jun-14

Inside the Eagle Nebula

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Credit & Copyright: T. A. Rector & B. A. Wolpa, NOAO, AURA

From afar, the whole thing looks like an Eagle. A closer look at the Eagle Nebula, however, shows the bright region is actually a window into the center of a larger dark shell of dust. Through this window, a brightly-lit workshop appears where a whole open cluster of stars is being formed. In this cavity tall pillars and round globules of dark dust and cold molecular gas remain where stars are still forming. Already visible are several young bright blue stars whose light and winds are burning away and pushing back the remaining filaments and walls of gas and dust. The Eagle emission nebula, tagged M16, lies about 6500 light years away, spans about 20 light-years, and is visible with binoculars toward the constellation of the Serpent (Serpens). This picture combines three specific emitted colors and was taken with the 0.9-meter telescope on Kitt Peak, Arizona,USA.

APOD NASA 16-feb-2014