Tag Archives: M78

M78, Nebula Messier 78

2янв

The nebula Messier 78 is a reflection nebula in the constellation Orion. It was discovered by Pierre Méchain in 1780 and included by Charles Messier in his catalog of comet-like objects that same year.

M78 is the brightest diffuse reflection nebula of a group of nebulae that include NGC 2064, NGC 2067 and NGC 2071. This group belongs to the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex and is about 1,600 light years distant from Earth. M78 is easily found in small telescopes as a hazy patch and involves two stars of 10th magnitude. These two stars, HD 38563A andHD 38563B, are responsible for making the cloud of dust in M78 visible by reflecting their light.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Takahashi TOA-150
Imaging cameras: QHYCCD QHY 11
Filters: Baader LRGB Ha SII OIII 2″
Resolution: 1411×1000
Dates: Dec. 21, 2014
Frames: 28×900″
Integration: 7.0 hours
Avg. Moon age: 28.38 days
Avg. Moon phase: 1.50%
RA center: 86.707 degrees
DEC center: 0.135 degrees
Pixel scale: 3.309 arcsec/pixel
Orientation: 148.685 degrees
Field radius: 0.795 degrees
Locations: Ruoyan Observatory, Urumqi, Xinjiang, China
Author: Steve Yan

M78 in Orion

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The nebula Messier 78 (also known as M 78 or NGC 2068) is a reflection nebula in the constellation Orion. It was discovered byPierre Méchain in 1780 and included by Charles Messier in his catalog of comet-like objects that same year.

M78 is the brightest diffuse reflection nebula of a group of nebulae that include NGC 2064, NGC 2067 and NGC 2071. This group belongs to the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex and is about 1,600 light years distant from Earth. M78 is easily found in smalltelescopes as a hazy patch and involves two stars of 10th magnitude. These two stars, HD 38563A and HD 38563B, are responsible for making the cloud of dust in M78 visible by reflecting their light.

About 45 variable stars of the T Tauri type, young stars still in the process of formation as well as some 17 Herbig–Haro objects are known in M78.
Imaging telescopes or lenses: William Optics FLT 132/925
Imaging cameras: Artemis Atik 383L+
Mounts: 10 Micron GM2000 QCI
Focal reducers: Tele Vue 0.8x Focal Reducer
Software: Adobe Photoshop CS2, DSS, Fitswork
Filters: Baader Planetarium 36mm Red, Baader Planetarium 36mm Green, Baader Planetarium 36mm Blue
Accessories: Lacerta MGEN2
Dates: Nov. 30, 2013, Dec. 2, 2013
Locations: Sahara, Marokko
Frames:
Baader Planetarium 36mm Blue: 7×600″ -20C bin 1×1
Baader Planetarium 36mm Green: 5×600″ -20C bin 1×1
Baader Planetarium 36mm Luminance: 11×600″ -20C bin 1×1
Baader Planetarium 36mm Red: 7×600″ -20C bin 1×1
Integration: 5.0 hours

Author: Stefan Westphal
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 25 Aug 2014

M 78 in Orion

b35d0b3e16f2da4b41ee309f9a94c760.1824x0_q100_watermark
The nebula Messier 78 (also known as M 78 or NGC 2068) is a reflection nebula in the constellation Orion. It was discovered by Pierre Méchain in 1780 and included by Charles Messier in his catalog of comet-like objects that same year.

M78 is the brightest diffuse reflection nebula of a group of nebulae that include NGC 2064, NGC 2067 and NGC 2071. This group belongs to the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex and is about 1,600 light years distant from Earth. M78 is easily found in small telescopes as a hazy patch and involves two stars of 10th magnitude. These two stars, HD 38563A and HD 38563B, are responsible for making the cloud of dust in M78 visible by reflecting their light.

About 45 variable stars of the T Tauri type, young stars still in the process of formation as well as some 17 Herbig–Haro objects are known in M78.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Geoptik “Formula25″ Newton 10″ 1250mm
Imaging cameras: Home made 450D Cmos Cooled – Baader
Mounts: Sky-Watcher NEQ6
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Geoptik 50/200 mm finderscope
Guiding cameras: Shoestring Astronomy USB Guide Port Interface, Xbox LiveWebcam
Software: photoshop, Pleiades Astrophoto, S.L. PixInsinght 1.8 RC7
Filters: HUTECH IDAS LPS P2
Accessories: Giosi Made Fasce anticondensa, Home made Arduino Focuser (project sir Jolo – ascom-jolo-focuser), Baader MPCC mpcc coma correcteur
Dates: Dec. 4, 2013, Dec. 5, 2013
Frames:
48×300″ -45C
HUTECH IDAS LPS P2: 45×300” 5C
Integration: 7.8 hours

Author:  Giosi Amante
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 30 July 2014

M 78 in Orion

2bd14196929ad3bb2f27a4b965694222.1824x0_q100_watermark
The nebula Messier 78 (also known as M 78 or NGC 2068) is a reflection nebula in the constellation Orion. It was discovered by Pierre Méchain in 1780 and included by Charles Messier in his catalog of comet-like objects that same year.

M78 is the brightest diffuse reflection nebula of a group of nebulae that include NGC 2064, NGC 2067 and NGC 2071. This group belongs to the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex and is about 1,600 light years distant from Earth. M78 is easily found in small telescopes as a hazy patch and involves two stars of 10th magnitude. These two stars,HD 38563A and HD 38563B, are responsible for making the cloud of dust in M78 visible by reflecting their light.

About 45 variable stars of the T Tauri type, young stars still in the process of formation as well as some 17 Herbig–Haro objects are known in M78.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Meade Starfinder 10″
Imaging cameras: QSI 683wsg-8
Mounts: Losmandy G11
Guiding cameras: The Imaging Source DMK41AF02.AS
Software: Main Sequence Software Sequence Generator Pro, PHD guiding, PixInsight, photoshop
Filters: B, R, L, Astronomik Green
Dates: Jan. 4, 2014
Frames: 48×300″
Integration: 4.0 hours

Author: Andrew Lockwood
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI
16 June 2014

Reflection nebula M78

0b49f1169fd3cf655a566290df0fd602.1824x0_q100_watermark_watermark_opacity-15_watermark_position-1_watermark_text-Copyright Michael Miller

The nebula Messier 78 (also known as M 78 or NGC 2068) is a reflection nebula in the constellation Orion.  M78 is the brightest diffuse reflection nebula of a group of nebulae that include NGC 2064, NGC 2067 and NGC 2071. This group belongs to the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex and is about 1,600 light years distant from Earth. M78 is easily found in smalltelescopes as a hazy patch and involves two stars of 10th magnitude. These two stars, HD 38563A and HD 38563B, are responsible for making the cloud of dust in M78 visible by reflecting their light.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Stellarvue SV 152
Imaging cameras: Apogee U16M
Mounts: Paramount MX
Software: DC-3 Dreams ACP, PixInsight PixInsinght 1.8 RC7, Maxim DL, photoshop
Filters: Astrodon E-series LRGB
Dates: Nov. 2, 2013
Locations: New Mexico Skies
Frames: 28×600″
Integration: 4.7 hours

Author: Mike Miller

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI
11 April 2014

M78 and Reflecting Dust Clouds

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Image Credit & Copyright: Ian Sharp

An eerie blue glow and ominous columns of dark dust highlight M78 and other bright reflection nebula in the constellation of Orion. The dark filamentary dust not only absorbs light, but also reflects the light of several bright blue stars that formed recently in the nebula. Of the two reflection nebulas pictured above, the more famous nebula is M78, in the image center, while NGC 2071 can be seen to its lower left. The same type of scattering that colors the daytime sky further enhances the blue color. M78 is about five light-years across and visible through a small telescope. M78 appears above only as it was 1600 years ago, however, because that is how long it takes light to go from there to here. M78 belongs to the larger Orion Molecular Cloud Complex that contains the Great Nebula in Orion and the Horsehead Nebula.

NASA APOD 26-Mar-2014