Tag Archives: Monoceros

V838 Light Echo: The Movie 

Image Credit: ESA, NASA, Hubble Space Telescope; Music: The Driving Force (Jingle Punks)

What caused this outburst of V838 Mon? For reasons unknown, star V838 Mon suddenly became one of the brightest stars in the entire Milky Way Galaxy. Then, just a few months later, it faded. A stellar flash like this has never been seen before — supernovas and novas expel a tremendous amount of matter out into space. Although the V838 Mon flash appeared to expel some material into space, what is seen in the above eight-frame movie, interpolated for smoothness, is actually an outwardly moving light echo of the flash. The actual time-span of the above movie is from 2002, when the flash was first recorded, to 2006. In a light echo, light from the flash is reflected by successively more distant ellipsoids in the complex array of ambient interstellar dust that already surrounded the star. Currently, the leading model for V838’s outburst was the orbital decay and subsequent merging of two relatively normal stars. V838 Mon lies about 20,000 light years away toward the constellation of Monoceros, while the largest light echo above spans about six light years in diameter.

NASA APOD 17-Jun-14

Rosette Nebula

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The Rosette Nebula (also known as Caldwell 49) is a large, circular H II region located near one end of a giant molecular cloud in the Monoceros region of the Milky Way Galaxy. The open cluster NGC 2244 (Caldwell 50) is closely associated with the nebulosity, the stars of the cluster having been formed from the nebula’s matter.

The cluster and nebula lie at a distance of some 5,200 light-years from Earth (although estimates of the distance vary considerably, down to 4,900 light-years.) and measure roughly 130 light years in diameter. The radiation from the young stars excite the atoms in the nebula, causing them to emit radiation themselves producing the emission nebula we see. Themass of the nebula is estimated to be around 10,000 solar masses.

It is believed that stellar winds from a group of O and B stars are exerting pressure on interstellar clouds to cause compression, followed by star formation in the nebula. This star formation is currently still ongoing.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Canon EF 200 f/2.8 L USM II
Imaging cameras: Canon 60Da
Mounts: Celestron Advanced VX
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Orion 50mm Helical Guider
Guiding cameras: Orion Star Shoot autoguider
Software: Adobe Photoshop CS4, Deep Sky Stacker
Filters: Astronomik H-alpha 6nm EOS Clip filter
Dates: Dec. 25, 2013, Dec. 26, 2013
Frames:
57×300″ ISO400
Astronomik H-alpha 6nm EOS Clip filter: 88×300″ ISO1600
Integration: 12.1 hours
Darks: ~30
Flats: ~40
Flat darks: ~40

Author: Chad Quandt
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 06 June 2014

The Cone Nebula from Hubble 

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Image Credit: Hubble Legacy Archive, NASA, ESA – Processing & Licence: Judy Schmidt
 

Stars are forming in the gigantic dust pillar called the Cone Nebula. Cones, pillars, and majestic flowing shapes abound in stellar nurseries where natal clouds of gas and dust are buffeted by energetic winds from newborn stars. The Cone Nebula, a well-known example, lies within the bright galactic star-forming region NGC 2264. The Cone was captured in unprecedented detail in this close-up composite of several observations from the Earth-orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. While the Cone Nebula, about 2,500 light-years away in Monoceros, is around 7 light-years long, the region pictured here surrounding the cone’s blunted head is a mere 2.5 light-years across. In our neck of the galaxy that distance is just over half way from the Sun to its nearest stellar neighbor, the Alpha Centauri star system. The massive star NGC 2264 IRS, seen by Hubble’s infrared camera in 1997, is the likely source of the wind sculpting the Cone Nebula and lies off the top of the image. The Cone Nebula’s reddish veil is produced by glowing hydrogen gas.

NASA APOD 28-May-14

Fox Fur Nebula in Monoceros

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Fox Fur Nebula  located about 2500 light years away toward the constellation of Monoceros, just north of the Cone Nebula. The nebula surrounding bright star S Mon is filled with dark dust and glowing gas.  The red regions of this nebula are caused by hydrogen gas that has been stimulated to emit its own light by the copious ultraviolet radiation coming from the hot, blue stars of the cluster. The blue areas shine by a different process: they are mainly dust clouds that reflect the bluish light of the same stars.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Astro-Physics 152mm f/7.5 Starfire EDF
Imaging cameras: FLI ProLine Proline 16803
Mounts: Software Bisque Paramount MX
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Takahashi FS-60C
Guiding cameras: Starlight Xpress Superstar
Focal reducers: Astro-Physics AP 4.0″ Field Flattener
Software: PixInsight 1.8, Software Bisque TheSky6 Professional, FocusMax, Cyanogen Maxim DL Pro 5, Photoshop CS Photo Shop CS5, CCD Autopilot 5
Filters: Astrodon E-series LRGB Ha 5nm
Accessories: Sirius Dome
Dates: Feb. 9, 2014
Locations: Home observatory, Sydney Australia
Frames: 36×600″
Integration: 6.0 hours

Author: David Nguyen

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI
24 April 2014

Seagull Nebula

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IC 2177 is a region of nebulosity that lies along the border between the constellations Monoceros and Canis Major. It is a roughly circular HII region centered on the Be star HD 53367. This nebula was discovered by Welsh amateur astronomer Isaac Roberts and was described by him as, “pretty bright, extremely large, irregularly round, very diffuse.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Astro-Physics 152mm f/7.5 Starfire EDF
Imaging cameras: FLI ProLine Proline 16803
Mounts: Software Bisque Paramount MX
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Takahashi FS-60C
Guiding cameras: Starlight Xpress Superstar
Focal reducers: Astro-Physics AP 4.0″ Field Flattener
Software: PixInsight 1.8, Software Bisque TheSky6 Professional, FocusMax, Cyanogen Maxim DL Pro 5, Photoshop CS Photo Shop CS5, CCD Autopilot 5
Filters: Astrodon E-series LRGB Ha 5nm
Accessories: Sirius Dome
Dates: March 13, 2014
Locations: Sydney Australia
Frames: 27×1200″
Integration: 9.0 hours

Author: David Nguyen

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI

22 March 2014

In the Heart of the Rosette Nebula

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Image Credit & Copyright: Don Goldman
In the heart of the Rosette Nebula lies a bright open cluster of stars that lights up the nebula. The stars of NGC 2244 formed from the surrounding gas only a few million years ago. The above image taken in January using multiple exposures and very specific colors of Sulfur (shaded red), Hydrogen (green), and Oxygen (blue), captures the central region in tremendous detail. A hot wind of particles streams away from the cluster stars and contributes to an already complex menagerie of gas and dust filaments while slowly evacuating the cluster center. The Rosette Nebula’s center measures about 50 light-years across, lies about 4,500 light-years away, and is visible with binoculars towards the constellation of the Unicorn (Monoceros).

NASA APOD 11-mar-2014

Star forming region NGC 2264: The Cone Nebula and the Christmas Tree Cluster

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The Cone Nebula is an H II region in the constellation of Monoceros. It was discovered by William Herschel on December 26, 1785, at which time he designated it H V.27. The nebula is located about 830 parsecs or 2,700 light-years away from Earth. The Cone Nebula forms part of the nebulosity surrounding the Christmas Tree Cluster. The designation of NGC 2264 in the New General Catalogue refers to both objects and not the nebula alone. The diffuse Cone Nebula, so named because of its apparent shape, lies in the southern part of NGC 2264, the northern part being the magnitude-3.9 Christmas Tree Cluster. It is in the northern part of Monoceros, just north of the midpoint of a line from Procyon to Betelgeuse.

Imaging cameras: Apogee Aspen 16M
Mounts: Software Bisque Paramount ME
Guiding cameras: SBIG STi
Focal reducers: Takahashi 645 Reducer QE 0.72X
Software: PixInsight, MaximDL 5
Filters: Astrodon Ha 3nm, Astrodon 3nm SII, Astrodon 3nm OIII
Dates: Jan. 27, 2014, Jan. 28, 2014
Frames:
Astrodon 3nm OIII: 10×1200″ bin 1×1
Astrodon 3nm SII: 6×1200″ bin 1×1
Astrodon Ha 3nm: 28×1200″ bin 1×1
Integration: 14.7 hours
Autor: Craig Prost

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI

16 February 2014

We select the best works of amateur astrophotographers with details of equipment, shooting processing etc.

NGC 2170 reflection nebula in the constellation Monoceros

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Reflecting the light of nearby hot stars, NGC 2170 is joined by other bluish reflection nebulae, a compact red emission region, and streamers of obscuring dust against a backdrop of stars. Like the common household items still life painters often choose for their subjects, the clouds of gas, dust, and hot stars pictured here are also commonly found in this setting – a massive, star-forming molecular cloud in the constellation of the Unicorn (Monoceros).  The giant molecular cloud, Mon R2, is impressively close, estimated to be only 2,400 light-years or so away.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Intes Micro MN84
Imaging cameras: QSI 583 wsg
Mounts: Astro-Physics 1200 GTO
Guiding cameras: Starlight Xpress Lodestar
Software: Adobe Photoshop CC, PixInsight
Dates: Nov. 9, 2013
Frames:
Astrodon Luminance: 12×1200″
Astrodon RGB filter set: 60×900″

Autor: Dean Salman

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI

05 February 2014

We select the best works of amateur astrophotographers with details of equipment, shooting processing etc.

NGC 2237: The Rosette Nebula

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The Rosette Nebula (also known as Caldwell 49) is a large, circular H II region located near one end of a giant molecular cloud in the Monoceros region of the Milky Way Galaxy. The open cluster NGC 2244 (Caldwell 50) is closely associated with the nebulosity, the starsof the cluster having been formed from the nebula’s matter. A survey of the nebula with the Chandra X-ray Observatory in 2001 has revealed the presence of very hot, young stars at the core of the Rosette Nebula. These stars have heated the surrounding gas to a temperature in the order of 6 million kelvins causing them to emit copious amounts of X-rays.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Takahashi TOA-130
Imaging cameras: FLI ML 11002
Mounts: Astro-Physics Mach 1 GTO
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Takahashi TOA-130
Guiding cameras: Starlight Xpress Lodestar
Software: Adobe Photoshop CS6, Main Sequence Software Sequence Generator Pro, CCDStack2
Filters: Astrodon Narrowband Set (Ha OIII SII)
Accessories: 67 Field Flattener
Dates: Jan. 11, 2014
Frames: 58×1200″

Autor: Mark Striebeck

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI

30 January 2014

We select the best works of amateur astrophotographers with details of equipment, shooting processing etc.

Rosette Nebula

Rosette

The Rosette Nebula (also known as Caldwell 49) is a large, circular H II region located near one end of a giant molecular cloud in the Monoceros region of the Milky Way Galaxy

Photographically the Rosette Nebula is easier to record and it is the only way to record the red color which is not seen visually.

Scope: Orion 190mm Maksutov Newtonian
Mount: Losmandy G-11
Camera: QHY9
Filtres: Astrodon Ha, OIII, SII

Autor: Maurice De Castro ( Dominican Republic )

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI
08 December 2013
We select the best works of amateur astrophotographers with details of equipment, shooting processing etc.