Tag Archives: NGC 281

NGC 281, Pac-man Nebulae

29дек

NGC 281 is an H II region in the constellation of Cassiopeia and part of the Perseus Spiral Arm. It includes the open cluster IC 1590, the multiple star HD 5005, and several Bok globules. Colloquially, NGC 281 is also known as the Pacman Nebula for its resemblance to the video game character.

The nebula was discovered in August 1883 by E. E. Barnard, who described it as “a large faint nebula, very diffuse.” The multiple star HD 5005, also called , was discovered by S. W. Burnham. It consists of an 8th-magnitude primary with four companions at distances between 1.4 and 15.7 seconds of arc. There has been no appreciable change in this quintuple system since the first measurements were made in 1875.

RA center: 13.191 degrees
DEC center: 56.643 degrees
Orientation: 81.034 degrees
Field radius: 0.450 degrees

 

NGC281 – Pacman Nebula
This is a composite image using as luminance narrow band frames from Bologna and DSS POSS II data.
RGB data from a former image from New Mexico skies by Robert Gendler
Copyright: R. Colombari / R. Gendler / P. Venturi
Data: P. Venturi /R. Gendler / NASA JPL-Caltech

Author: Roberto Colombari

NGC 281, Pacman Nebula

17дек

NGC 281 is an H II region in the constellation of Cassiopeia and part of the Perseus Spiral Arm. It includes the open cluster IC 1590, the multiple star HD 5005, and several Bok globules. Colloquially, NGC 281 is also known as the Pacman Nebula for its resemblance to the video game character.

The nebula was discovered in August 1883 by E. E. Barnard, who described it as “a large faint nebula, very diffuse.” The multiple star HD 5005, also called beta-1, was discovered by S. W. Burnham. It consists of an 8th-magnitude primary with four companions at distances between 1.4 and 15.7 seconds of arc. There has been no appreciable change in this quintuple system since the first measurements were made in 1875.

The nebula is visible in amateur telescopes from dark sky locations. In his book Deep Sky Wonders, Walter Scott Houston describes the appearance of the nebula in small telescopes.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Astro-Physics AP 130mm f/6.3 Starfire EDF
Imaging cameras: SBIG STXL-11002/FW8G-STXL
Mounts: Astro-Physics Mach1AP GTO with GTOCP3
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Astro-Physics AP 130mm f/6.3 Starfire EDF
Guiding cameras: SBIG STXL-11002/FW8G-STXL
Software: Pixinsight 1.8, Photoshop CS5, Maxim DL Pro 5
Filters: Astrodon 3nm SII, Astrodon 3nm OIII, Astrodon H-alpha 3 nm
Resolution: 2719×3600
Dates: Dec. 4, 2014, Dec. 6, 2014, Dec. 11, 2014
Frames:
Astrodon 3nm OIII: 13×900″ bin 1×1
Astrodon 3nm SII: 14×900″ bin 2×2
Astrodon H-alpha 3 nm: 26×900″ bin 1×1
Integration: 13.2 hours
Avg. Moon age: 15.16 days
Avg. Moon phase: 91.20%
Locations: My back deck, Glen Ellyn, IL, United States

NGC 281

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NGC 281 is an H II region in the constellation of Cassiopeia and part of the Perseus Spiral Arm. It includes the open cluster IC 1590, the multiple star HD 5005, and several Bok globules. Colloquially, NGC 281 is also known as the Pacman Nebula for its resemblance to the video game character.

The nebula was discovered in August 1883 by E. E. Barnard, who described it as “a large faint nebula, very diffuse.” The multiple star HD 5005, also called \beta1, was discovered by S. W. Burnham. It consists of an 8th-magnitude primary with four companions at distances between 1.4 and 15.7 seconds of arc. There has been no appreciable change in this quintuple system since the first measurements were made in 1875.

The nebula is visible in amateur telescopes from dark sky locations. In his book Deep Sky Wonders, Walter Scott Houston describes the appearance of the nebula in small telescopes

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Altair Astro Wave Series 115 F7 ED Triplet APO
Imaging cameras: Canon EOS 600Da
Mounts: SkyWatcher NEQ6 pro Goto
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Orion Mini 50mm Guide Scope
Guiding cameras: Starshoot Autoguider
Focal reducers: Altair Astro PlanoStar 3″ Flattener
Software: Astrotortilla, DeepSky Stacker 3.3.3 Deep Sky Stacker 3.3.3, Photoshop CS5
Resolution: 4906×3193
Frames: 70×600″
Integration: 11.7 hours
RA center: 13.234 degrees
DEC center: 56.578 degrees
Pixel scale: 1.093 arcsec/pixel
Orientation: 81.918 degrees
Field radius: 0.889 degrees

Astrophotography of the day of  SPONLI, 31.10.2014

Pacman Nebula

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NGC 281 is an H II region in the constellation of Cassiopeia and part of the Perseus Spiral Arm. It includes the open cluster IC 1590, the multiple star HD 5005, and several Bok globules. Colloquially, NGC 281 is also known as the Pacman Nebula for its resemblance to the video game character.

The nebula was discovered in August 1883 by E. E. Barnard, who described it as “a large faint nebula, very diffuse.” The multiple star HD 5005, also called \beta1, was discovered by S. W. Burnham. It consists of an 8th-magnitude primary with four companions at distances between 1.4 and 15.7 seconds of arc. 

Imaging telescopes or lenses: William Optics FLT 110 TEC
Imaging cameras: Atik 314L+
Mounts: Skywatcher EQ6 goto
Focal reducers: TMB Field Flattner for FLT
Filters: Baader Planetarium Ha 7nm, Baader Planetarium OIII, SII
Resolution: 1365×1011
Dates: Oct. 1, 2014
Locations: Observatoire “Le Pré des Étoiles”
Frames: 18×600″
Integration: 3.0 hours
Avg. Moon age: 6.54 days
Avg. Moon phase: 41.10%
RA center: 13.254 degrees
DEC center: 56.624 degrees
Pixel scale: 1.863 arcsec/pixel
Orientation: 92.443 degrees
Field radius: 0.439 degrees

Аuthor: Claude Roth

AstroPhotography of the day of SPONLI, 13.10.2014

NGC 281 in the constellation of Cassiopeia

d4c27289e5864ced0db0af7e842c049d.1824x0_q100_watermark

NGC 281 is an H II region in the constellation of Cassiopeia and part of the Perseus Spiral Arm. It includes the open cluster IC 1590, the multiple star HD 5005, and several Bok globules. Colloquially, NGC 281 is also known as the Pacman Nebula for its resemblance to the video game character.

The nebula was discovered in August 1883 by E. E. Barnard, who described it as “a large faint nebula, very diffuse.” The multiple star HD 5005, also called \beta1, was discovered by S. W. Burnham. It consists of an 8th-magnitude primary with four companions at distances between 1.4 and 15.7 seconds of arc. There has been no appreciable change in this quintuple system since the first measurements were made in 1875.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: GSO RC8
Imaging cameras: Canon EOS 450D / Digital Rebel XSi / Kiss X2
Mounts: Sky-Watcher NEQ6
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Sky-Watcher Equinox 80
Guiding cameras: lacerta mgen2
Focal reducers: AP CCDT67
Software: photoshop, PixInsight, Iris
Accessories: Astronomik ha filter 12nm (EOS clip type), astronomik CLS filter (EOS Clip)
Dates: July 9, 2012, Oct. 30, 2012
Frames:
Astronomik Clip CLS: 35×300″ ISO400 bin 1×1
Astronomik H-alpha 12nm: 10×300″ ISO400 bin 1×1
Integration: 3.8 hours
Darks: ~22
Flats: ~38
Bias: ~35

Author:  Philippe Mingasson
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 29 July 2014

NGC 281: the Pacman Nebula in Cassiopeia

c3580bfedd5e49c846cb830203961cf4.1824x0_q100_watermark_watermark_opacity-10_watermark_position-4_watermark_text-Copyright Pekka Simell

NGC 281 is an H II region in the constellation of Cassiopeia and part of the Perseus Spiral Arm. It includes the open cluster IC 1590, the multiple star HD 5005, and several Bok globules. Colloquially, NGC 281 is also known as the Pacman Nebula for its resemblance to thevideo game character.

The nebula was discovered in August 1883 by E. E. Barnard, who described it as “a large faint nebula, very diffuse.” The multiple star HD 5005, also called \beta1, was discovered by S. W. Burnham. It consists of an 8th-magnitude primary with four companions at distances between 1.4 and 15.7 seconds of arc. There has been no appreciable change in this quintuple system since the first measurements were made in 1875.

The nebula is visible in amateur telescopes from dark sky locations.

Imaging cameras: Atik 383L+
Mounts: Astro-Physics Mach 1 GTO
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Teleskop Service 10″ Newton F4.8
Guiding cameras: Orion StarShoot Autoguider
Focal reducers: ASA 2″ x 0,73 Corrector/Reducer 2KORRR
Software: PixInsight PixInsinght 1.8 RC7
Filters: Baader Planetarium Baader 2″ Narrowband Set
Dates: Sept. 5, 2013, Sept. 6, 2013, Nov. 6, 2013
Frames:
Baader Planetarium Ha 7nm: 22×400″ -20C bin 1×1
Baader Planetarium OIII 8.5nm: 20×400″ -20C bin 2×2
Baader Planetarium SII 8nm: 20×400″ -20C bin 2×2
Integration: 6.9 hours
Darks: ~11
Flats: ~20
Flat darks: ~20
Bias: ~20

Autor: Pekka Simell

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI

15 January 2014

We select the best works of amateur astrophotographers with details of equipment, shooting processing etc.

NGC 281: the Pacman Nebula

f0d102afcd150866594a88c7263e8a6e.1824x0_q100_watermark_watermark_opacity-10_watermark_position-2_watermark_text-Copyright Pasquale Costantino
NGC 281
 is an H II region in the constellation of Cassiopeia and part of the Perseus Spiral Arm. It includes the open cluster IC 1590, the multiple star HD 5005, and several Bok globules. Colloquially, NGC 281 is also known as the Pacman Nebula for its resemblance to thevideo game character.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: GSO RC 8″ f/8
Imaging cameras: ATIK 11000c
Mounts: Gemini G42 Observatory+
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Celestron 80/600
Guiding cameras: Atik Titan
Focal reducers: Teleskop-Service TS 2″ Flattener
Software: Astroart 5
Filters: IDAS LPS-V4
Resolution: 3469×2197
Dates: Dec. 19, 2013
Frames: 35×300″
Integration: 2.9 hours

Autor: Pasquale Costantino

25 December 2013

We select the best works of amateur astrophotographers with details of equipment, shooting processing etc.