Tag Archives: NGC 5139

Millions of Stars in Omega Centauri 

NGC 5139 / Chile 2014
Image Credit & Copyright: CEDIC Team, Processing – Christoph Kaltseis

 Globular star cluster Omega Centauri, also known as NGC 5139, is some 15,000 light-years away. The cluster is packed with about 10 million stars much older than the Sun within a volume about 150 light-years in diameter, the largest and brightest of 200 or so known globular clusters that roam the halo of our Milky Way galaxy. Though most star clusters consist of stars with the same age and composition, the enigmatic Omega Cen exhibits the presence of different stellar populations with a spread of ages and chemical abundances. In fact, Omega Cen may be the remnant core of a small galaxy merging with the Milky Way. This astronomically sharp color image of the classic globular cluster was recorded in March under Chilean skies from Hacienda Los Andes.

NASA APOD 29-May-14

Omega Globular Cluster

a165d0ee324d8b34db71360a7e65df9a.1824x0_q100_watermarkOmega Centauri (ω Cen) or NGC 5139, is a globular cluster in the constellation of Centaurus that was discovered by Edmond Halley in 1677. Located at a distance of 15,800 light-years (4,850 pc), it is the largest globular cluster in the Milky Way galaxy. Omega Centauri is so distinctive from the other galactic globular clusters that it is thought to have an alternate origin as the core remnant of a disrupted dwarf galaxy.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Intes Micro MN84
Imaging cameras: QSI 583 wsg
Mounts: Astro-Physics 1200 GTO
Guiding cameras: Starlight Xpress Lodestar
Filters: Astrodon RGB filter set
Dates: May 14, 2011
Frames: 36×300″
Integration: 3.0 hours

Author: Dean Salman

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI
19 April 2014