Tag Archives: NGC 6514

The Trifid Nebula (Messier 20, M20, NGC 6514)

M20 Mosaic 3 by Denis @Disev 5 апреля

The Trifid Nebula (catalogued as Messier 20 or M20 and as NGC 6514) is an H II region located in Sagittarius. It was discovered by Charles Messier on June 5, 1764. Its name means ‘divided into three lobes’. The object is an unusual combination of an open cluster of stars; an emission nebula (the lower, red portion), a reflection nebula (the upper, blue portion) and a dark nebula (the apparent ‘gaps’ within the emission nebula that cause the trifurcated appearance; these are also designated Barnard 85). Viewed through a small telescope, the Trifid Nebula is a bright and peculiar object, and is thus a perennial favorite of amateur astronomers. The image has been made as a mosaic of 3 images, 60 s exposition each.

Place: Observatory SPONLI
Telescope: LX200 122
Camera: STF 8300C
Filter: Clear
Binning: 2
Series of photo: C-1×60 /
Sky temperature: -15,8°C
Temperature: 22,4°C
Humidity: 84%
Cloudiness: Haze
Wind: 6,6 k/h
Dew Point: 19,6°C
Author: Denis@Disev

SPONLI is a project about astrophotography, for amateur astronomers.

Be the first-one to know about the launch of the project – pass an easy registration on our web-site:
https://en.sponli.com/registration/

Trifid Nebula, M20, NGC 6514

25янв

The Trifid Nebula (catalogued as Messier 20 or M20 and as NGC 6514) is an H II region located in Sagittarius. It was discovered by Charles Messier on June 5, 1764. Its name means ‘divided into three lobes’. The object is an unusual combination of an open cluster of stars; an emission nebula (the lower, red portion), a reflection nebula (the upper, blue portion) and a dark nebula (the apparent ‘gaps’ within the emission nebula that cause the trifurcated appearance; these are also designated Barnard 85). Viewed through a small telescope, the Trifid Nebula is a bright and peculiar object, and is thus a perennial favorite of amateur astronomers.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Orion AstroView 6 EQ
Mounts: Orion EQ 3-2
Software: Luc Coiffier’s DeekSkyStacker (DSS), Photoshop CS6
Accessories: Orion EQ-3M Single Axis Drive
Resolution: 1600×1378
Dates: April 8, 2013
Frames: 68×30″
Integration: 0.6 hours
Avg. Moon age: 27.16 days
Avg. Moon phase: 6.23%
RA center: 270.600 degrees
DEC center: -22.917 degrees
Orientation: 124.184 degrees
Field radius: 0.528 degrees
Locations: Observatório caseiro, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil

Author: Victor Brasil Sabbagh

Trifid Nebula

9e2125a425704817e85c0288683b1143.1824x0_q100_watermark_watermark_opacity-10_watermark_position-6_watermark_text-Copyright Rafael Compassi

The Trifid Nebula (catalogued as Messier 20 or M20 and as NGC 6514) is an H II region located in Sagittarius. It was discovered by Charles Messier on June 5, 1764. Its name means ‘divided into three lobes’. The object is an unusual combination of an open cluster ofstars; an emission nebula (the lower, red portion), a reflection nebula (the upper, blue portion) and a dark nebula (the apparent ‘gaps’ within the emission nebula that cause the trifurcated appearance; these are also designated Barnard 85). Viewed through a small telescope, the Trifid Nebula is a bright and peculiar object, and is thus a perennial favorite of amateur astronomers.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: GSO 12″ Reflector GSO 12″ F/5
Imaging cameras: Canon EOS 1000D / Rebel XS
Mounts: Homemade equatorial mount German Equatorial from Darío Pires
Software: Adobe Photoshop CS6, DeepSky Stacker 3.3.2 DeepSkyStacker V 3.2.2
Resolution: 3888×2592
Dates: Oct. 20, 2014
Locations: Eimer Sternen Observatory
Frames: 17×30″
Integration: 0.1 hours
Avg. Moon age: 25.89 days
Avg. Moon phase: 14.28%
RA center: 270.641 degrees
DEC center: -22.979 degrees
Pixel scale: 0.780 arcsec/pixel
Orientation: -59.289 degrees
Field radius: 0.506 degrees

Аuthor: RCompassi
Astrophotography of the day of SPONLI, 29.10.2014

Trifid Nebula

cec9189b03b09bd8020e689470b7c577.1824x0_q100_watermark_watermark_opacity-20_watermark_position-4_watermark_text-Copyright Stefan Westphal
The Trifid Nebula (catalogued as Messier 20 or M20 and as NGC 6514) is an H II region located in Sagittarius.
The Trifid Nebula was the subject of an investigation by astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope in 1997, using filters that isolate emission from hydrogen atoms, ionized sulfur atoms, and doubly ionized oxygen atom. The images were combined into a false-color composite picture to suggest how the nebula might look to the eye.
The close-up images show a dense cloud of dust and gas, which is a stellar nursery full of embryonic stars. This cloud is about8 light-years away from the nebula’s central star. A stellar jet protrudes from the head of the cloud and is about 0.75 ly long. The jet’s source is a young stellar object deep within the cloud. Jets are the exhaust gasses of star formation. Radiation from the nebula’s central star makes the jet glow.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: GSO RC 8″ Carbon
Imaging cameras: Artemis Atik 383L+
Mounts: Fornax 51
Guiding telescopes or lenses: GSO RC 8″ Carbon
Guiding cameras: M-Gen Guiding Kamera
Focal reducers: Astro-Physics CCD tele compressor CCDT67 – 0.67x Reducer
Software: Fitswork4, Adobe Photoshop CS 6, Deep Sky Stacker 3.3.3 Beta 51 DSS DeepSkyStacker
Filters: Baader Planetarium 36mm Luminance, Baader Planetarium 36mm Red, Baader Planetarium 36mm Green, Baader Planetarium 36mm Blue
Accessories: Lacerta MGEN2, Teleskop-Service TS OAG 9mm
Dates: July 27, 2014, July 31, 2014
Locations: Namibia
Frames:
Baader Planetarium 36mm Blue: 7×360″ -20C bin 1×1
Baader Planetarium 36mm Green: 5×360″ -20C bin 1×1
Baader Planetarium 36mm Luminance: 16×360″ -20C bin 1×1
Baader Planetarium 36mm Red: 8×360″ -20C bin 1×1
Integration: 3.6 hours
Darks: ~12
Flats: ~48
Bias: ~150

Author: Stefan Westphal
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 22 Aug 2014

Trifid Nebula

d3e971d9c3724abecfcc6c689a4a8bea.1824x0_q100_watermark
The Trifid Nebula (catalogued as Messier 20 or M20 and as NGC 6514) is an H II region located in Sagittarius. The object is an unusual combination of an open cluster of stars; an emission nebula (the lower, red portion), a reflection nebula (the upper, blue portion) and a dark nebula (the apparent ‘gaps’ within the emission nebula that cause the trifurcated appearance; these are also designated Barnard 85). Viewed through a small telescope, the Trifid Nebula is a bright and peculiar object, and is thus a perennial favorite of amateur astronomers.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Meade LXD 55 SN6
Imaging cameras: Canon EOS 450D modified
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Meade LXD 55 SN6
Guiding cameras: QHY5
Dates: June 29, 2014
Frames: 10×300″
Integration: 0.8 hours

Author: Pedro Asunción
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 14 July 2014

Trifid nebula in Saggitarius

2b3c624fc231000c35e1299dcd65a36f.1824x0_q100_watermark
The Trifid Nebula (catalogued as Messier 20 or M20 and as NGC 6514) is an H II region located in Sagittarius. It was discovered by Charles Messier on June 5, 1764. Its name means ‘divided into three lobes’. The object is an unusual combination of an open cluster of stars; an emission nebula (the lower, red portion), a reflection nebula (the upper, blue portion) and a dark nebula (the apparent ‘gaps’ within the emission nebula that cause the trifurcated appearance; these are also designated Barnard 85). Viewed through a small telescope, the Trifid Nebula is a bright and peculiar object, and is thus a perennial favorite of amateur astronomers.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Meade Starfinder 10″
Imaging cameras: QSI 683wsg-8
Mounts: Losmandy G11
Guiding cameras: starlight express lodestar
Software: Main Sequence Software Sequence Generator Pro, PHD guiding, PixInsight, photoshop
Filters: B, R, L, Astronomik Green
Dates: May 29, 2014

Author: Andrew Lockwood

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 13 June 2014