Tag Archives: Northern Cross

IC 1318 – Butterfly Nebula

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Sadr, the central star of the Northern Cross, is surrounded by extensive regions of emission nebulosity. One such region is IC 1318, also known as the Bufferfly Nebula. The dark lane separating the two “wings” is a dark nebula known as LDN 889. Sadr shines at magnitude 2.2, and is about 1550 light-years from Earth. The name is Arabic for “The Hen’s Chest”.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Meade Series 5000 80mm Apo
Imaging cameras: Canon 500D (Mod)
Mounts: Orion USA Atlas EQ-G Computerized GoTo Telescope Mount
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Orion USA 80mm Short-tube
Guiding cameras: Orion StarShoot AutoGuider
Software: Alignmaster, PHD guiding, BinaryRivers BackyardEOS, photoshop, Cartes du Ciel, Luc Coiffier’s DeepSkyStacker Live
Filters: Astronomik CLS Canon EOS Clip
Accessories: Astro-Tech 2″ Field Flattener
Dates: April 27, 2014
Frames: 18×300″
Integration: 1.5 hours

Author: Wellerson Lopes

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 16 May 2014

Clouds and Crosses over Haleakala

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Image Credit & Copyright: Wally Pacholka (TWAN)

Aloha and welcome to a breathtaking skyscape. The dreamlike panoramic view from March 27 looks out over the 10,000 foot summit of Haleakala on Maui, Hawai’i. A cloud layer seeps over the volcanic caldera’s edge with the Milky Way and starry night sky above. Head of the Northern Cross asterism, supergiant star Deneb lurks within the Milky Way’s dust clouds and nebulae at the left. From there you can follow the arc of the Milky Way all the way to the stars of the more compact Southern Cross, just above the horizon at the far right. A yellowish Mars is right of center, near the top of the frame, with rival red giant Antares below it, closer to the Milky Way’s central bulge. Need some help identifying the stars? Just slide your cursor over the picture, or download this labeled panorama.

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NASA APOD 12-Apr-2014

From the Northern to the Southern Cross

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Image Credit & Copyright: Nicholas Buer

Explanation: There is a road that connects the Northern to the Southern Cross but you have to be at the right place and time to see it. The road, as pictured above, is actually the central band of our Milky Way Galaxy; the right place, in this case, is dark Laguna Cejar in Salar de Atacama of Northern Chile; and the right time was in early October, just after sunset. Many sky wonders were captured then, including the bright Moon, inside theMilky Way arch; Venus, just above the Moon; Saturn and Mercury, just below the Moon; the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds satellite galaxies, on the far left; red airglow near the horizon on the image left; and the lights of small towns at several locations across the horizon. One might guess that composing this 30-image panorama would have been a serene experience, but for that one would have required earplugs to ignore the continuedbrays of wild donkeys.
NASA APOD 27-Jan-2014