Tag Archives: Perseids

Perseid in Moonlight 

Persei93_1abolfath
Image Credit & Copyright: Amir Hossein Abolfath (TWAN)

 Bright moonlight from a Full Moon near perigee illuminates the night and casts shadows in this skyscape from central Iran. Taken on August 12, near the peak of the annual Perseid meteor shower the exposure also captures a bright and colorful perseid streak above the shady tree in the foreground. This year the super moonlight interfered with meteor watching into the early morning hours, overwhelming the trails from many fainter perseids in the shower. Brighter perseids like this one were still visible though, their trails pointing back to the heroic constellation Perseus outlined at the right. Swept up as planet Earth orbits through dust left behind from periodic comet Swift-Tuttle, the cosmic grains that produce perseid meteors enter the atmosphere at nearly 60 kilometers per second, heated to incandesence and vaporized at altitudes of about 100 kilometers. Next year, Perseid meteors will flash through dark skies under a New Moon.
NASA APOD 15-Aug-14

A Perseid Below 

perseid_iss_4256
Image Credit: Ron Garan, ISS Expedition 28 Crew, NASA

 Denizens of planet Earth typically watch meteor showers by looking up. But this remarkable view, captured on August 13, 2011 by astronaut Ron Garan, caught a Perseid meteor by looking down. From Garan’s perspective onboard the International Space Station orbiting at an altitude of about 380 kilometers, the Perseid meteors streak below, swept up dust left from comet Swift-Tuttle heated to incandescence. Theglowing comet dust grains are traveling at about 60 kilometers per second through the denser atmosphere around 100 kilometers above Earth’s surface. In this case, the foreshortened meteor flash is right of frame center, below the curving limb of the Earth and a layer of greenish airglow, just below bright star Arcturus. Want to look up at a meteor shower? You’re in luck, as the 2014 Perseids meteor shower peaks this week. Unfortunately, the fainter meteors in this year’s shower will be hard to see in a relatively bright sky lit by the glow of a nearly full Moon.

APOD NASA 10-Aug-14

The Perseids

The Perseids are a prolific meteor shower associated with the comet Swift-Tuttle. The Perseids are so-called because the point from which they appear to come, called the radiant, lies in the constellation Perseus. The name derives in part from the word Perseides (Περσείδες), a term found in Greek mythology referring to the sons of Perseus.
The earliest information on this meteor shower is found in Chinese annals in 36 AD. However credit for recognising the shower’s annual appearance is given to Adolphe Quetelet who reported in 1835 that there was a shower emanating from the constellation Perseus.  Some Catholics refer to the Perseids as the “tears of St. Lawrence”, since 10 August is the date of that saint’s martyrdom.

With SPONLI Space is getting closer!