Tag Archives: Planetary nebula

Planetary Nebula NGC 2818 from Hubble 

Planetary Nebula NGC 2818, Hubble Space Telescope
Image Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble Heritage Team (STScI / AURA)

 NGC 2818 is a beautiful planetary nebula, the gaseous shroud of a dying sun-like star. It could well offer a glimpse of the future that awaits our own Sun after spending another 5 billion years or so steadily using up hydrogen at its core, and then finally helium, as fuel for nuclear fusion. Curiously, NGC 2818 seems to lie within an open star cluster, NGC 2818A, that is some 10,000 light-years distant toward the southern constellation Pyxis (the Compass). At the distance of the star cluster, the nebula would be about 4 light-years across. But accurate velocity measurements show that the nebula’s own velocity is very different from the cluster’s member stars. The result is strong evidence that NGC 2818 is only by chance found along the line of sight to the star cluster and so may not share the cluster’s distance or age. The Hubble image is a composite of exposures through narrow-band filters, presenting emission from nitrogen, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms in the nebula as red, green, and blue hues.

APOD NASA 13-Jul-14

Halo of the Cat’s Eye 

catseye2_not_2048
Image Credit & Copyright: R. Corradi (Isaac Newton Group), Nordic Optical Telescope

The Cat’s Eye Nebula (NGC 6543) is one of the best known planetary nebulae in the sky. Its haunting symmetries are seen in the very central region of this stunning false-color picture, processed to reveal the enormous but extremely faint halo of gaseous material, over three light-years across, which surrounds the brighter, familiar planetary nebula. Made with data from the Nordic Optical Telescope in the Canary Islands, the composite picture shows extended emission from the nebula. Planetary nebulae have long been appreciated as a final phase in the life of a sun-like star. Only much more recently however, have some planetaries been found to have halos like this one, likely formed of material shrugged off during earlier active episodes in the star’s evolution. While the planetary nebula phase is thought to last for around 10,000 years, astronomers estimate the age of the outer filamentary portions of this halo to be 50,000 to 90,000 years.

NASA APOD 01-Jun-14

Planetary Nebula Abell 36 

abell36Block
Image Credit & Copyright: Adam Block, Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter, Univ. Arizona

 The gorgeous, gaseous shroud of a dying sunlike star, planetary nebula Abell 36 lies a mere 800 light-years away in the constellation of Virgo. At that distance it spans over 1.5 light-years in this sharp telescopic view. Shrugging off its outer layers, the nebula’s central star is contracting and becoming hotter, evolving towards a final white dwarf phase. In fact, in Abell 36, the central star is estimated to have a surface temperature of over 73,000 K, compared to the Sun’s present 6,000 K temperature. As a result, the intensely hot star is much brighter in ultraviolet light, compared to its visual appearance here. The invisible ultraviolet light ionizes hydrogen and oxygen atoms in the nebula and ultimately powers the beautiful visible light glow.
NASA APOD 30-May-14

Planetary nebula Abell 31

b291d36bc1c73aeb1fe7e90e6cc55d73.1824x0_q100_watermark_watermark_opacity-10_watermark_position-6_watermark_text-Samuli Vuorinen
Abell 31
 is an ancient planetary nebula in the constellation of Cancer. It is estimated to be about 2,000 light years away. Although it is one of the largest planetary nebulae in the sky, it is not very bright.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Boren-Simon PowerNewt 8
Imaging cameras: Atik 460EX
Mounts: Sky-Watcher EQ-6 Pro
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Teleskop-Service Finderscope
Guiding cameras: QHYCCD QHY5
Focal reducers: ASA 2″ x 0,73 Corrector/Reducer 2KORRR
Software: PixInsight, Maxim DL, AstroTortilla
Filters: Astronomik SII 12nm, OIII 12nm, Astronomik H-alpha 12nm
Accessories: Lunatico Astronomia Seletek Armadillo
Dates: March 29, 2014
Frames:
Astronomik H-alpha 12nm: 5×600″ -15C bin 1×1
OIII 12nm: 5×600″ -15C bin 1×1
Astronomik SII 12nm: 5×600″ -15C bin 1×1
Integration: 2.5 hours
Flats: ~20
Bias: ~500

Author: Samuli Vuorinen

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI
5 Abril 2014

Sh2-290: planetary nebula in constellation Cancer

ce7c88bcfa00a57fec76eab1e84fc73a.1824x0_q100_watermark_watermark_opacity-10_watermark_position-6_watermark_text-Copyright Domenico De Luca
Sh2-290 is an ancient planetary nebula. A planetary nebula is created when a low-mass star blows off its outer layers at the end of its life. Sh2-290 is one of the largest known planetary nebulae, with a diameter of about 7 parsecs. The bluish interior is from energized oxygen atoms. The bright side of the nebula is due to its interaction with ambient interstellar gas.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: TecnoSky Apo 70/420
Imaging cameras: Atik 314L+ Mono
Mounts: Skywatcher HEQ5 Pro
Guiding telescopes or lenses: TecnoSky Telescopio Guida 50/168
Guiding cameras: QHY5-II QHY-5 color
Focal reducers: GSO 0.75X
Software: Maxim DL 5 MaxIm DL Pro 5, Adobe Photoshop CS5 Photoshop CS5
Filters: Baader H-alpha 7nm
Dates: Jan. 26, 2014, Jan. 28, 2014
Frames:
Baader H-alpha 7nm : 4×1800″ -10C bin 1×1
Baader OIII 1.25″ Filter: 4×1800″ -10C bin 1×1

Autor: Domenico De Luca

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI

02 February 2014

We select the best works of amateur astrophotographers with details of equipment, shooting processing etc.

Planetary nebula Jones-Emberson 1

Processed with MaxIm DL
Jones-Emberson 1
 (PK 164+31.1) is a 14th magnitude planetary nebula in the constellation Lynx at a distance of 1600 light years. It is a larger planetary with low surface brightness. The 16.8-magnitude central star is very blue white dwarf.

20 in RC Optical Systems telescope Operating at f/8.4
Paramount ME Robotic Telescope Mount
SBIG ST10XME CCD camera with color filter wheel

L R G B color production was used to create this image:
L = 105 minutes binned 1×1
Red = 20 minutes binned 2×2
Green = 20 minutes binned 2×2
Blue = 20 minutes binned 2×2

Autor: Adam Block

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI
13 December 2013

We select the best works of amateur astrophotographers with details of equipment, shooting processing etc.

Planetary Nebula Abell 7

Abell7Web_goldman950

Image Credit & Copyright: 
Don Goldman

Very faint planetary nebula Abell 7 is some 1,800 light-years distant, just south of Orion in planet Earth’s skies in the constellation Lepus, The Hare. Surrounded by Milky Way stars and near the line-of-sight to distant background galaxies, its generally simple spherical shape, about 8 light-years in diameter, is outlined in this deep telescopic image. Within its confines are beautiful, more complex details enhanced by the use ofnarrowband filters. Emission from hydrogen and nitrogen is shown in reddish hues with oxygen emission mapped to a bluish-green color, giving Abell 7 a more natural appearance that would otherwise be much too faint to be appreciated by eye. A planetary nebula represents a very brief final phase in stellar evolution that our own Sun will experience 5 billion years hence, as the nebula’s central, once sun-like star shrugs off its outer layers. Abell 7 itself is estimated to be 20,000 years old. Its central star is seen here as a fading white dwarf some 10 billion years old.

NASA APOD