Tag Archives: Pleiades

Pleiades, M45

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In astronomy, the Pleiades, or Seven Sisters (Messier 45 or M45), is an open star cluster containing middle-aged hot B-type stars located in the constellation of Taurus. It is among the nearest star clusters to Earth and is the cluster most obvious to the naked eye in the night sky. The celestial entity has several meanings in different cultures and traditions.

The cluster is dominated by hot blue and extremely luminous stars that have formed within the last 100 million years. Dust that forms a faint reflection nebulosity around the brightest stars was thought at first to be left over from the formation of the cluster (hence the alternate name Maia Nebula after the star Maia), but is now known to be an unrelated dust cloud in the interstellar medium, through which the stars are currently passing. Computer simulations have shown that the Pleiades was probably formed from a compact configuration that resembled the Orion Nebula. Astronomers estimate that the cluster will survive for about another 250 million years, after which it will disperse due to gravitational interactions with its galactic neighborhood.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: William Optics GT102 102mm f/6.9 Apo Refractor
Imaging cameras: Canon 600D astromod
Guiding telescopes or lenses: William Optics 50mm Guidescope
Guiding cameras: Orion StarShoot Autoguider
Software: Adobe Photoshop deepsky stacker
Resolution: 2601×1732
Dates: Nov. 15, 2014
Frames: 10×600″
Integration: 1.7 hours
Avg. Moon age: 22.46 days
Avg. Moon phase: 46.67%
RA center: 56.736 degrees
DEC center: 24.130 degrees
Pixel scale: 3.040 arcsec/pixel
Orientation: 94.099 degrees
Field radius: 1.319 degrees

Author:  Cadby

M45, Pleiades

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In astronomy, the Pleiades, or Seven Sisters (Messier 45 or M45), is an open star cluster containing middle-aged hot B-type stars located in the constellation of Taurus. It is among the nearest star clusters to Earth and is the cluster most obvious to the naked eye in the night sky. The celestial entity has several meanings in different cultures and traditions.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Orion 80ED
Imaging cameras: Canon EOS 1000D / Rebel XS
Mounts: Orion Sirius EQ-G
Guiding cameras: Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager & Autoguider
Focal reducers: Orion 0.85x Reducer/Corrector
Software: DeepSkyStacker, PHD guiding, photoshop, Canon EOS
Dates: Oct. 7, 2011
Frames: 24×240″ ISO1600
Integration: 1.6 hours

Author: Mike Carroll
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 10 Sep 2014

Pleiades

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The nine brightest stars of the Pleiades are named for the Seven Sisters of Greek mythologySteropeMeropeElectraMaiaTaygetaCelaeno, and Alcyone, along with their parents Atlas and Pleione. As daughters of Atlas, the Hyades were sisters of the Pleiades. The English name of the cluster itself is of Greek origin (Πλειάδες), though of uncertain etymology. Suggested derivations include: from πλεῖν plein, “to sail,” making the Pleiades the “sailing ones”; from πλέος pleos, “full, many”; or from πελειάδες peleiades, “flock of doves.” 

Pleiades bright stars
Name Pronunciation (IPA & respelling) Designation Apparent magnitude Stellar classification
Alcyone /ælˈsaɪ.əniː/ al-sy-ə-nee Eta (25) Tauri 2.86 B7IIIe
Atlas /ˈætləs/ at-ləs 27 Tauri 3.62 B8III
Electra /ɨˈlɛktʃrə/ i-lek-trə 17 Tauri 3.70 B6IIIe
Maia /ˈmeɪə/, /ˈmaɪə/ maymy 20 Tauri 3.86 B7III
Merope /ˈmɛrəpiː/ merr-ə-pee 23 Tauri 4.17 B6IVev
Taygeta /teɪˈɪdʒɨtə/ tay-ij-i-tə 19 Tauri 4.29 B6V
Pleione /ˈplaɪ.əniː/ ply-ə-nee 28 (BU) Tauri 5.09 (var.) B8IVpe
Celaeno /sɨˈliːnoʊ/ sə-lee-noh 16 Tauri 5.44 B7IV
Sterope, Asterope /ˈstɛrɵpiː/, /əˈstɛrɵpiː/ (ə)-sterr-ə-pee 21 and 22 Tauri 5.64;6.41 B8Ve/B9V
18 Tauri 5.65 B8V

Imaging telescopes or lenses: TMB 92SS
Imaging cameras: SBIG ST-8300C, SBIG ST-8300M
Mounts: Sky-Watcher HEQ5
Guiding telescopes or lenses: TMB 92SS
Guiding cameras: QHYCCD QHY5
Focal reducers: Teleskop-Service TS 2.5″ flattener
Software: Maxim DL, photoshop
Filters: Baader Planetarium UV/IR Cut Filter, Hutech IDAS LPS-P2
Accessories: Teleskop-Service OAG 9mm
Dates: Sept. 17, 2012, Sept. 24, 2012
Frames:
Hutech IDAS LPS-P2: 40×600″ bin 1×1
Baader Planetarium UV/IR Cut Filter: 25×600″ bin 1×1
Integration: 10.8 hours

Author: Jacek Bobowik
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 30 June 2014

The Pleiades in Taurus

8bed5d9e60e87ef09fcd400c3220b562.1824x0_q100_watermark_watermark_opacity-10_watermark_position-6_watermark_text-Copyright Chad Quandt

The cluster core radius is about 8 light years and tidal radius is about 43 light years. The cluster contains over 1,000 statistically confirmed members, although this figure excludes unresolved binary stars. It is dominated by young, hot blue stars, up to 14 of which can be seen with the naked eye depending on local observing conditions. The arrangement of the brightest stars is somewhat similar to Ursa Major andUrsa Minor. The total mass contained in the cluster is estimated to be about 800 solar masses.

The cluster contains many brown dwarfs, which are objects with less than about 8% of the Sun’s mass, not heavy enough for nuclear fusion reactions to start in their cores and become proper stars. They may constitute up to 25% of the total population of the cluster, although they contribute less than 2% of the total mass. Astronomers have made great efforts to find and analyse brown dwarfs in the Pleiades and other young clusters, because they are still relatively bright and observable, while brown dwarfs in older clusters have faded and are much more difficult to study.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Takahashi TSA120
Imaging cameras: Canon 60Da
Mounts: Software Bisque Paramount MX
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Astro-Tech AT72ED
Guiding cameras: SBIG ST-i Mono
Software: Adobe Photoshop CS4, Deep Sky Stacker, Software Bisque The Sky X Pro
Accessories: Astro Tech ATFF
Dates: Nov. 24, 2013
Frames: 53×300″
Integration: 4.4 hours

Author: Chad Quandt
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 08 June 2014

The Pleiades Deep and Dusty

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Image Credit & Copyright: David Lane

The well known Pleiades star cluster is slowly destroying part of a passing cloud of gas and dust. The Pleiades is the brightest open cluster of stars on Earth’s sky and can be seen from almost any northerly location with the unaided eye. The passing young dust cloud is thought to be part of Gould’s belt, an unusual ring of young star formation surrounding the Sun in the local Milky Way Galaxy. Over the past 100,000 years, part Gould’s belt is by chance moving right through the older Pleiades and is causing a strong reaction between stars and dust. Pressure from the star’s light significantly repels the dust in the surrounding blue reflection nebula, with smaller dust particles being repelled more strongly. A short-term result is that parts of the dust cloud have become filamentary and stratified, as seen in the above deep-exposure image.

NASA APOD 25-feb-2014

M45: Pleiades in Taurus

beb3da4c3bb6b10a808dfc4376f99b96.1824x0_q100_watermark_watermark_opacity-10_watermark_position-6_watermark_text-Copyright Giulio Ercolani
Seven Sisters (Messier object 45 or M45), is an open star cluster containing middle-aged hot B-type stars located in the constellation of Taurus.  The most famous star cluster on the sky, the bright stars of the Pleiades can be seen without binoculars from even the depths of a light-polluted city.

Under ideal observing conditions, some hint of nebulosity may be seen around the cluster, and this shows up in long-exposure photographs. It is areflection nebula, caused by dust reflecting the blue light of the hot, young stars. It was formerly thought that the dust was left over from the formation of the cluster, but at the age of about 100 million years generally accepted for the cluster, almost all the dust originally present would have been dispersed by radiation pressure. Instead, it seems that the cluster is simply passing through a particularly dusty region of the interstellar medium. Studies show that the dust responsible for the nebulosity is not uniformly distributed, but is concentrated mainly in two layers along the line of sight to the cluster. These layers may have been formed by deceleration due to radiation pressure as the dust has moved towards the stars.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Takahashi FSQ Fluorite
Imaging cameras: SBIG STL-11000M
Mounts: Paramount GT-1100S
Dates: Oct. 2, 2013
Locations: Mayhill
Frames:
4×300″ bin 1×1
RGB filters: 3×300″ bin 1×1
Integration: 0.6 hours

Autor: Giulio Ercolani

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI

28 January 2014

We select the best works of amateur astrophotographers with details of equipment, shooting processing etc.

The Gegenschein Over Chile

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Image Credit & Copyright:
 Yuri Beletsky (Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Institution)

Is the night sky darkest in the direction opposite the Sun? No. In fact, a rarely discernable faint glow known as the gegenschein (German for “counter glow”) can be seen 180 degrees around from the Sun in an extremely dark sky. The gegenschein is sunlight back-scattered off small interplanetary dust particles. These dust particles are millimeter sized splinters from asteroids and orbit in the ecliptic plane of the planets. Pictured above from last year is one of the more spectacular pictures of the gegenschein yet taken. Here a deep exposure of an extremely dark sky over Las Campanas Observatory in Chile shows the gegenschein so clearly that even a surrounding glow is visible. Notable background objects include the Andromeda galaxy, the Pleiades star cluster, the California Nebula, the belt of Orion just below the Orion Nebula and inside Barnard’s Loop, and bright stars Sirius and Betelgeuse. The gegenschein is distinguished from zodiacal light near the Sun by the high angle of reflection. During the day, a phenomenon similar to the gegenschein called the glory can be seen in reflecting air or clouds opposite the Sun from an airplane.
APOD NASA 14-Jan-2014

Pleiades

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In astronomy, the Pleiades (/ˈplaɪ.ədiːz/ or /ˈpliː.ədiːz/), or Seven Sisters (Messier object 45 or M45), is an open star cluster containing middle-aged hot B-type stars located in the constellation of Taurus. It is among the nearest star clusters to Earth and is the cluster most obvious to thenaked eye in the night sky. The name Pleiades comes from Greek mythology; the celestial entity has several meanings in different cultures and traditions.

The cluster is dominated by hot blue and extremely luminous stars that have formed within the last 100 million years. Dust that forms a faintreflection nebulosity around the brightest stars was thought at first to be left over from the formation of the cluster (hence the alternate name Maia Nebula after the star Maia), but is now known to be an unrelated dust cloud in the interstellar medium, through which the stars are currently passing. Computer simulations have shown that the Pleiades was probably formed from a compact configuration that resembled the Orion Nebula. Astronomers estimate that the cluster will survive for about another 250 million years, after which it will disperse due to gravitational interactions with its galactic neighborhood.

Date: 01.09.2013
Time: 02:00 (GMT)
Equipment: Canon EOS 600D + EF70-200 f / 4 L + SynScan AZ (20x30sec, ISO 1600)
Editor: DSS + FSIV + PS

Author
member of the project SPONLI
Amateur astrophotographer Pavel Konstantinov