Tag Archives: Sagittarius

Omega Nebula in Sagittarius

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The Omega Nebula, also known as the Swan NebulaCheckmark NebulaLobster Nebula, and the Horseshoe Nebula (catalogued as Messier 17 or M17 and as NGC 6618) is an H II region in the constellation Sagittarius. It was discovered by Philippe Loys de Chéseaux in 1745. Charles Messier catalogued it in 1764. It is located in the rich starfields of the Sagittarius area of the Milky Way.
The Omega Nebula is between 5,000 and 6,000 light-years from Earth and it spans some 15 light-years in diameter. The cloud ofinterstellar matter of which this nebula is a part is roughly 40 light-years in diameter and has a mass of 30,000 solar masses. The total mass of the Omega Nebula is an estimated 800 solar masses.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: GSO Newton 12″ f/4
Imaging cameras: ATIK 11000m
Mounts: Skywatcher EQ8
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Orion 50 mm mini guider
Guiding cameras: Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager & Autoguider
Focal reducers: ASA Wynne 3″ Corrector 0.95x
Software: photoshop, Startools 1.3.5, CCDStack, Maxim DL
Filters: Orion 2” LRGB filter set, Baader Ha 2″
Dates: June 6, 2014
Frames:
Orion 2” LRGB filter set: 9×300″ -15C bin 2×2
Baader Ha 2″: 4×600″ -15C bin 1×1
Integration: 1.4 hours

Author: Paul Storey
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 18 July 2014

Trifid Nebula

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The Trifid Nebula (catalogued as Messier 20 or M20 and as NGC 6514) is an H II region located in Sagittarius. The object is an unusual combination of an open cluster of stars; an emission nebula (the lower, red portion), a reflection nebula (the upper, blue portion) and a dark nebula (the apparent ‘gaps’ within the emission nebula that cause the trifurcated appearance; these are also designated Barnard 85). Viewed through a small telescope, the Trifid Nebula is a bright and peculiar object, and is thus a perennial favorite of amateur astronomers.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Meade LXD 55 SN6
Imaging cameras: Canon EOS 450D modified
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Meade LXD 55 SN6
Guiding cameras: QHY5
Dates: June 29, 2014
Frames: 10×300″
Integration: 0.8 hours

Author: Pedro Asunción
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 14 July 2014

Lagoon Nebula

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The Lagoon Nebula (catalogued as Messier 8 or M8, and as NGC 6523) is a giant interstellar cloud in the constellation Sagittarius. It is classified as an emission nebula and as a H II region.

The Lagoon Nebula was discovered by Giovanni Hodierna before 1654 and is one of only two star-forming nebulae faintly visible to the naked eye from mid-northern latitudes. Seen with binoculars, it appears as a distinct oval cloudlike patch with a definite core. A fragile star cluster appears superimposed on it.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Konus Super 120/1000
Imaging cameras: Praktica MTL-5
Mounts: Konus EQ3.2
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Konus Vista 80/400
Software: Corel Paint Shop Pro x2, aurigaimaging Registar 1.0
Dates: July 31, 2008
Locations: Albaneta – Pollino
Frames: 6×1200″
Integration: 2.0 hours

Author: Giuseppe Donatiello
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 06 July 2014

Trifid nebula in Saggitarius

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The Trifid Nebula (catalogued as Messier 20 or M20 and as NGC 6514) is an H II region located in Sagittarius. It was discovered by Charles Messier on June 5, 1764. Its name means ‘divided into three lobes’. The object is an unusual combination of an open cluster of stars; an emission nebula (the lower, red portion), a reflection nebula (the upper, blue portion) and a dark nebula (the apparent ‘gaps’ within the emission nebula that cause the trifurcated appearance; these are also designated Barnard 85). Viewed through a small telescope, the Trifid Nebula is a bright and peculiar object, and is thus a perennial favorite of amateur astronomers.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Meade Starfinder 10″
Imaging cameras: QSI 683wsg-8
Mounts: Losmandy G11
Guiding cameras: starlight express lodestar
Software: Main Sequence Software Sequence Generator Pro, PHD guiding, PixInsight, photoshop
Filters: B, R, L, Astronomik Green
Dates: May 29, 2014

Author: Andrew Lockwood

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 13 June 2014

Star Factory Messier 17 

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Image Credit & Copyright: Subaru Telescope (NAOJ), Hubble Space Telescope;
Processing: Robert Gendler & Roberto Colombari

 What’s happening at the center of this nebula? Sculpted by stellar winds and radiation, the star factory known as Messier 17 lies some 5,500 light-years away in the nebula-rich constellation Sagittarius. At that distance, this degree wide field of view spans almost 100 light-years. The sharp, composite, color image utilizing data from space and ground based telescopes, follows faint details of the region’s gas and dust clouds against a backdrop of central Milky Way stars. Stellar winds and energetic light from hot, massive stars formed from M17’s stock of cosmic gas and dust have slowly carved away at the remaining interstellar material producing the cavernous appearance and undulating shapes. M17 is also known as the Omega Nebula or the Swan Nebula.
NASA APOD 27-May-14

M8 and M20 – Lagoon and Trifid Nebulae

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If you are in dark skies and can see the Milky Way streaming up from the horizon, you may notice a black area with two little fuzz balls in it that look like puffs of steam. If you are in suburbs or cities, you may notice just a fuzzy star above the spout. The fuzzy star or fuzz balls are the Lagoon and Trifid nebulae, or Messier Objects 8 and 20. You are seeing two star-forming regions toward the heart of our galaxy.

The Trifid is a little dimmer than the Lagoon. Trifid got its name because in photographs it has three distinct lobes. The Lagoon got its moniker because it looks like a round pool just outside the ocean of the Milky Way.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Orion ED80T-CF
Imaging cameras: Nikon D7100
Mounts: Skywatcher AZ-EQ6 GT
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Orion 50mm mini guidescope
Guiding cameras: Orion Star Shoot autoguider (SSAG)
Focal reducers: TeleVue 0.8x Photo Reducer/Flattener TRF-2008
Software: Adobe Lightroom 5, StarTools64, PHD Guiding, Luc Coiffier DeepSkyStacker
Dates: Sept. 26, 2013
Frames: 6×300″
Integration: 0.5 hours

Author: Vincent_Bellandi
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 25 May 2014

Trifid Nebula in Sagittarius

24d4e3f910655b02d7f3b0e0d9d76313.1824x0_q100_watermarkThe Trifid Nebula (catalogued as Messier 20 or M20 and as NGC 6514) is an H II region located in Sagittarius. It is approximately 5000 ly away from Earth. Its apparent magnitude is 6.3. The object is an unusual combination of an open cluster of stars; an emission nebula (the lower, red portion), a reflection nebula (the upper, blue portion) and a dark nebula (the apparent ‘gaps’ within the emission nebula that cause the trifurcated appearance.
Viewed through a small telescope, the Trifid Nebula is a bright and peculiar object, and is thus a perennial favorite of amateur astronomers.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Celestron C8 SCT
Imaging cameras: QHYCCD QHY8L
Mounts: Skywatcher HEQ5 Pro Goto
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Orion ShortTube 80
Guiding cameras: QHYCCD QHY5L-II Mono
Focal reducers: Celestron f/6.3 Focal Reducer/Corrector
Software: Cyanogen Maxim DL, DeepSkyStacker, Startools 1.3, PHD guiding, photoshop, Leandro Fornaziero Pardal Astronomy controls
Dates: April 26, 2014
Frames: 18×300″
Integration: 1.5 hours

Author: Leandro Fornaziero

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI
03 May 2014

Lagoon Nebula in Sagittarius

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The Lagoon Nebula (catalogued as M8, and as NGC 6523) is a giant interstellar cloud in the constellation Sagittarius. It is classified as an emission nebula and as a H II region.

The Lagoon Nebula was discovered by Giovanni Hodierna before 1654 and is one of only two star-forming nebulae faintly visible to the naked eye from mid-northern latitudes. Seen with binoculars, it appears as a distinct oval cloudlike patch with a definite core. A fragile star cluster appears superimposed on it.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Celestron C8 SCT
Imaging cameras: QHYCCD QHY8L
Mounts: Skywatcher HEQ5 Pro Goto
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Orion ShortTube 80
Guiding cameras: QHYCCD QHY5L-II Mono
Focal reducers: Celestron f/6.3 Focal Reducer/Corrector
Software: DeepSkyStacker, Startools 1.3, Cyanogen Maxim DL, PHD guiding, photoshop, Leandro Fornaziero Pardal Astronomy controls
Dates: April 29, 2014
Frames: 30×300″
Integration: 2.5 hours

Author: Leandro Fornaziero

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI
01 May 2014

The Trifid Nebula

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Also known as M20, this photogenic nebula is visible with good binoculars towards the constellation of Sagittarius. The energetic processes of star formation create not only the colors but the chaos. The red-glowing gas results from high-energy starlight striking interstellar hydrogen gas. The dark dust filaments that lace M20 were created in the atmospheres of cool giant stars and in the debris from supernovae explosions. The light from M20 we see today left perhaps 3,000 years ago.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Intes Micro MN84
Imaging cameras: QSI 583 wsg
Mounts: Astro-Physics 1200 GTO
Software: Adobe Photoshop CC, PixInsight
Filters: Astrodon H-alpha 3nm narrowband filter, Astrodon Luminance, Astrodon RGB filter set
Dates: Oct. 26, 2013
Frames:
Astrodon H-alpha 3nm narrowband filter: 6×1200″
Astrodon Luminance: 9×600″
Astrodon RGB filter set: 72×600″
Integration: 15.5 hours

Author: Dean Salman

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI
18 April 2014

Nebulae of Sgr OB5 association

b92f395a002aea5bfaa031e50ce55456.1824x0_q100_watermark_watermark_opacity-10_watermark_position-6_watermark_text-Copyright Dean SalmanComplex of HII regions located in the Sgr OB5 association in the Sagittarius arm.
Sh2-19 is located in the middle of the image with Sh2-16 located to the lower right. In the middle of those two lies Sh2-18. Sh2-20 can be seen in the upper left and most of Sh2-17 is in the upper right.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Intes Micro MN84
Imaging cameras: QSI 583 wsg
Mounts: Astro-Physics 1200 GTO
Guiding cameras: Starlight Xpress Lodestar
Software: PixInsight, Adobe Photoshop CC
Filters: Astrodon H-alpha 3nm narrowband filter, Astrodon RGB filter set
Dates: May 18, 2013
Frames:
Astrodon H-alpha 3nm narrowband filter: 18×1200″
Astrodon RGB filter set: 72×600″
Integration: 18.0 hours

Author: Dean Salman

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI
16 April 2014