Tag Archives: Serpens

Eagle Nebula in Serpens

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The Eagle Nebula is part of a diffuse emission nebula, or H II region, which is catalogued as IC 4703. This region of active current star formation is about 7000 light-years distant. The tower of gas that can be seen coming off the nebula is approximately 9.5 light-years or about 90 trillion kilometers long.

The brightest star in the nebula (HD 168076) has an apparent magnitude of +8.24, easily visible with good binoculars. It is actually abinary star formed of an O3.5V star plus an O7.5V companion.
The cluster associated with the nebula has approximately 460 stars, the brightest of spectral class O, a mass of roughly 80 solar masses, and a luminosity up to 1 million times that of the Sun. Its age has been estimated to be 1–2 million years.
The descriptive names reflect impressions of the shape of the central pillar rising from the southeast into the central luminous area. The name “Star Queen Nebula” was introduced by Robert Burnham, Jr., reflecting his characterization of the central pillar as the Star Queen shown in silhouette.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: AG Optical 12.5 IDK
Mounts: Paramount MX
Software: photoshop, DC-3 Dreams ACP, PixInsight PixInsinght 1.8 RC7, Maxim DL
Filters: Astrodon H-alpha 5nm, Astrodon E-series LRGB
Dates: June 18, 2014
Locations: New Mexico Skies

Author: Mike Miller
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 22 July 2014

Hubble’s Messier 5 

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Image Credit: 
HST, ESA, NASA

“Beautiful Nebula discovered between the Balance [Libra] & the Serpent [Serpens] …” begins the description of the 5th entry in 18th century astronomer Charles Messier’s famous catalog of nebulae and star clusters. Though it appeared to Messier to be fuzzy and round and without stars, Messier 5 (M5) is now known to be a globular star cluster, 100,000 stars or more, bound by gravity and packed into a region around 165 light-years in diameter. It lies some 25,000 light-years away. Roaming the halo of our galaxy, globular star clusters are ancient members of the Milky Way. M5 is one of the oldest globulars, its stars estimated to be nearly 13 billion years old. The beautiful star cluster is a popular target for Earthbound telescopes. Of course, deployed in low Earth orbit on April 25, 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope has also captured its own stunning close-up view that spans about 20 light-years near the central region of M5. Even close to its dense core at the left, the cluster’s aging red and blue giant stars and rejuvenated blue stragglers stand out in yellow and blue hues in the sharp color image.

NASA APOD 25-Apr-14

Eagle nebula

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The Eagle Nebula (catalogued as Messier 16 or M16, and as NGC 6611, and also known as the Star Queen Nebula) is a young open cluster of stars in the constellation Serpens, discovered by Jean-Philippe de Cheseaux in 1745-46. Its name derives from its shape that is thought to resemble an eagle. It contains several active star-forming gas and dust regions.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Celestron C8 SCT
Imaging cameras: QHYCCD QHY5L-II Mono, Nikon D5000
Mounts: Skywatcher HEQ5 Pro Goto
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Orion ShortTube 80
Guiding cameras: QHYCCD QHY5L-II Mono
Focal reducers: Celestron f/6.3 Focal Reducer/Corrector, GSO 1.25″ 0.5x Focal Reducer
Software: DeepSkyStacker, PHD guiding, Leandro Fornaziero Pardal Astronomy controls
Resolution: 2532×1588
Dates: July 3, 2013
Locations: Home
Frames: 1×3000″

Autor: Leandro Fornaziero

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI
17 December 2013

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