Tag Archives: supernova remnant

Supernova Remnant Puppis A

PupAmulti_rot
Image Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/IAFE/ G. Dubner et al., ESA/XMM-Newton
Infrared: NASA/ESA/JPL-Caltech/GSFC/ R. Arendt et al.

 Driven by the explosion of a massive star, supernova remnant Puppis A is blasting into the surrounding interstellar medium about 7,000 light-years away. At that distance, this remarkable false-color exploration of its complex expansion is about 180 light-years wide. It is based on the most complete X-ray data set so far from the Chandra and XMM/Newton observations, and infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope. In blue hues, the filamentary X-ray glow is from gas heated by the supernova’s shock wave, while the infrared emission shown in red and green is from warm dust. The bright pastel tones trace the regions where shocked gas and warmed dust mingle. Light from the initial supernova itself, triggered by the collapse of the massive star’s core, would have reached Earth about 3,700 years ago, though the Puppis A supernova remnant remains a strong source in the X-ray sky.

APOD NASA 12-Sep-14

Cosmic Crab Nebula 

NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory Celebrates 15th Anniversary
Image Credit: NASA, Chandra X-ray Observatory, SAO, DSS

The Crab Pulsar, a city-sized, magnetized neutron star spinning 30 times a second, lies at the center of this tantalizing wide-field image of the Crab Nebula. A spectacular picture of one of our Milky Way’s supernova remnants, it combines optical survey data with X-ray data from the orbiting Chandra Observatory. The composite was created as part of a celebration of Chandra’s 15 year long exploration of the high energy cosmos. Like a cosmic dynamo the pulsar powers the X-ray and optical emission from the nebula, accelerating charged particles to extreme energies to produce the jets and rings glowing in X-rays. The innermost ring structure is about a light-year across. With more mass than the Sun and the density of an atomic nucleus, the spinning pulsar is the collapsed core of the massive star that exploded, while the nebula is the expanding remnant of the star’s outer layers. The supernova explosion was witnessed in the year 1054.

APOD NASA 25-Jul-2014

SN 1006 Supernova Remnant 

sn1006c
Image Credit: NASA, ESA, Zolt Levay (STScI)

 A new star, likely the brightest supernova in recorded human history, lit up planet Earth’s sky in the year 1006 AD. The expanding debris cloud from the stellar explosion, found in the southerly constellation of Lupus, still puts on a cosmic light show across the electromagnetic spectrum. In fact, this composite view includes X-ray data in blue from the Chandra Observatory, optical data in yellowish hues, and radio image data in red. Now known as the SN 1006 supernova remnant, the debris cloud appears to be about 60 light-years across and is understood to represent the remains of a white dwarf star. Part of a binary star system, the compact white dwarf gradually captured material from its companion star. The buildup in mass finally triggered a thermonuclear explosion that destroyed the dwarf star. Because the distance to the supernova remnant is about 7,000light-years, that explosion actually happened 7,000 years before the light reached Earth in 1006. Shockwaves in the remnant accelerate particles to extreme energies and are thought to be a source of the mysterious cosmic rays.

APOD NASA 12-Jul-14

A Corner of SNR in Vela

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The Vela supernova remnant is a supernova remnant in the southern constellation Vela. Its source supernova exploded approximately 11,000-12,300 years ago (and was about 800 light years away). The association of the Vela supernova remnant with the Vela pulsar, made by astronomers at the University of Sydney in 1968, was direct observational proof that supernovae form neutron stars.

The Vela supernova remnant includes NGC 2736. It also overlaps the Puppis Supernova Remnant, which is four times more distant. Both the Puppis and Vela remnants are among the largest and brightest features in the X-ray sky.

The Vela supernova remnant (SNR) is one of the closest known to us. The Geminga pulsar is closer (and also resulted from a supernova), and in 1998 another supernova remnant was discovered, RX J0852.0-4622, which from our point of view appears to be contained in the southeastern part of the Vela remnant.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Astro-Physics AP130 Gran Turismo
Imaging cameras: Canon EOS 1000D / Rebel XS
Mounts: Losmandy G11
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Bouch & Lomb SCT 80/800
Guiding cameras: Philips SP 900 NC
Focal reducers: Astro-Physics 0.75x
Software: Canon Digital Photo Professional, PixInsight, PHD guiding
Dates: Jan. 19, 2012
Frames: 44×300″
Integration: 3.7 hours

Author: Ignacio Diaz Bobillo

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI

19 March 2014

M1: Crab Nebula in Ha, OIII

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The Crab Nebula (catalogue designations M1, NGC 1952, Taurus A) is a supernova remnant and pulsar wind nebula in the constellation of Taurus. Corresponding to a bright supernova recorded by Chinese astronomers in 1054, the nebula was observed later by English astronomerJohn Bevis in 1731. At an apparent magnitude of 8.4, comparable to that of the largest moon of Saturn, it is not visible to the naked eye but can be made out using binoculars under favourable conditions.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Selfmade Super Astrograph 8″ f4
Imaging cameras: SBIG ST- 8300M
Mounts: Skywatcher AZ EQ6 GT
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Selfmade Super Astrograph 8″ f4
Guiding cameras: ALccd5-IIm
Software: Fitswork, Adobe Photoshop CS5
Filters: Baader Planetariun Ha 7nm, Baader Planetariun OIII 8.5nm
Accessories: TS 9mm OAG, Pal Gyulai Komakorrektor
Dates: March 11, 2014, March 12, 2014
Frames:
Baader Planetariun Ha 7nm: 16×900″
Baader Planetariun OIII 8.5nm: 16×900″
Integration: 8.0 hours

Autor: Petko Marinov

15 March 2014

We select the best works of amateur astrophotographers with details of equipment, shooting processing etc.

The Long Jet of the Lighthouse Nebula

A pulsar moving at supersonic speeds about 23,000 light years from Earth.
X-ray Image Credit: NASA / CXC / ISDC / L. Pavan et al.

The Lighthouse nebula was formed by the wind of a pulsar, a rapidly rotating, magnetized neutron star, as it speeds through the interstellar medium at over 1,000 kilometers per second. Some 23,000 light-years distant toward the southern constellation Carina, pulsar and wind nebula (cataloged as IGR J1104-6103) are indicated at the lower right in this remarkable image from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Energetic particles generated by the pulsar are swept back into the wind’s comet-like tail trailing up and to the left, along the direction of the pulsar’s motion away from its parent supernova remnant. Both runaway pulsar and expanding remnant debris field are the aftermath of the core-collapse-explosion of a massive star, with the pulsar kicked out by the supernova explosion. Adding to the scene of exotic cosmic extremes is a long, spiraling jet extending for almost 37 light-years, but nearly at a right angle to the pulsar’s motion. The high-energy particle jet is the longest known for any object in our Milky Way galaxy.

APOD NASA 21-feb-2014

Supernova remnant – Simeis 147

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Simeis 147, also known as the Spaghetti NebulaSNR G180.0-01.7 or Sharpless 2-240, is a supernova remnant (SNR) that may have occurred in the Milky Way, on the constellation borders of Auriga and Taurus. Discovered in 1952 at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory using a 25 inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope, it is a very difficult object to observe due to its extreme low brightness. The nebulous area is fairly large with an almost spherical shell and filamentary structure. The remnant has an apparent diameter that covers approximately 3°, an estimated distance of approximately 3000 (±350) ly away and an age of approximately 40,000y old.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Takahashi FSQ 106ED
Imaging cameras: SBIG STL-11000
Mounts: Losmandy G11
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Orion ShortTube 80 f/5
Guiding cameras: Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager & Autoguider
Focal reducers: Takahashi 0.75x FSQ
Filters: Astrodon Red, Astrodon G, Astrodon Filter: Blue, Astrodon h-Alpha
Dates: Jan. 1, 2014
Frames:
Astrodon G: 8×600″ -25C bin 1×1
Astrodon h-Alpha: 8×1200″ -25C bin 1×1
Astrodon h-Alpha: 8×900″ -25C bin 1×1
Astrodon Filter: Blue: 8×600″ -25C bin 1×1
Astrodon Red: 8×600″ -25C bin 1×1
Darks: ~3
Flats: ~3
Flat darks: ~3
Bias: ~3

Autor: Maurizio Cabibbo

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI

07 February 2014

We select the best works of amateur astrophotographers with details of equipment, shooting processing etc.