Tag Archives: supernova

No X-rays from SN 2014J 

m82SNchandra_BandA

Image Credit: NASA / CXC / SAO / R. Margutti et al.
 

 Last January, telescopes in observatories around planet Earth were eagerly used to watch the rise of SN 2014J, a bright supernova in nearby galaxy M82. Still, the most important observations may have been from orbit where the Chandra X-ray Observatory saw nothing. Identified as a Type Ia supernova, the explosion of SN2014J was thought to be triggered by the buildup of mass on a white dwarf star steadily accreting material from a companion star. That model predicts X-rays would be generated when the supernova blastwave struck the material left surrounding the white dwarf. But no X-rays were seen from the supernova. The mostly blank close-ups centered on the supernova’s position are shown in the before and after inset panels of Chandra’s false color X-ray image of the M82 galaxy. The stunning lack of X-rays from SN 2014J will require astronomers to explore other models to explain what triggers these cosmic explosions.

APOD NASA 16-Aug-14

Supernova remnant – Simeis 147

9485b75b052f65ea9169c849d8eced95.1824x0_q100_watermark
Simeis 147, also known as the Spaghetti NebulaSNR G180.0-01.7 or Sharpless 2-240, is a supernova remnant (SNR) that may have occurred in the Milky Way, on the constellation borders of Auriga and Taurus. Discovered in 1952 at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory using a 25 inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope, it is a very difficult object to observe due to its extreme low brightness. The nebulous area is fairly large with an almost spherical shell and filamentary structure. The remnant has an apparent diameter that covers approximately 3°, an estimated distance of approximately 3000 (±350) ly away and an age of approximately 40,000y old.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Takahashi FSQ 106ED
Imaging cameras: SBIG STL-11000
Mounts: Losmandy G11
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Orion ShortTube 80 f/5
Guiding cameras: Orion Star Shoot Planetary Imager & Autoguider
Focal reducers: Takahashi 0.75x FSQ
Filters: Astrodon Red, Astrodon G, Astrodon Filter: Blue, Astrodon h-Alpha
Dates: Jan. 1, 2014
Frames:
Astrodon G: 8×600″ -25C bin 1×1
Astrodon h-Alpha: 8×1200″ -25C bin 1×1
Astrodon h-Alpha: 8×900″ -25C bin 1×1
Astrodon Filter: Blue: 8×600″ -25C bin 1×1
Astrodon Red: 8×600″ -25C bin 1×1
Darks: ~3
Flats: ~3
Flat darks: ~3
Bias: ~3

Autor: Maurizio Cabibbo

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI

07 February 2014

We select the best works of amateur astrophotographers with details of equipment, shooting processing etc.

Bright Supernova in M82

M82SN_ArrowBlock
Image Credit & Copyright: Adam Block, Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter, U. Arizona

Astronomers really don’t find supernovae by looking for the arrows. But in this image taken January 23rd, an arrow does point to an exciting, new supernova, now cataloged as SN 2014J, in nearby bright galaxy M82. Located near the Big Dipper in planet Earth’s sky, M82 is also known as the Cigar Galaxy, a popular target for telescopes in the northern hemisphere. In fact, SN 2014J was first spotted as an unfamiliar sourcein the otherwise familiar galaxy by teaching fellow Steve Fossey and astronomy workshop students Ben Cooke, Tom Wright, Matthew Wilde and Guy Pollack at the University College London Observatory on the evening of January 21. M82 is a mere 12 million light-years away (so the supernova explosion did happen 12 million years ago, that light just now reaching Earth), making supernova SN 2014J one of the closest to be seen in recent decades. Spectra indicate it is a Type Ia supernova caused by the explosion of a white dwarf accreting matter from a companion star. By some estimates two weeks away from its maximum brightness, SN 2014J is already the brightest part of M82 and visible in small telescopes in the evening sky.

NASA APOD 24-Jan-2014