Tag Archives: The Sculptor Galaxy

The Sculptor Galaxy, NGC 253

10апр

The Sculptor Galaxy, also known as the Silver Coin or Silver Dollar Galaxy, NGC 253, is an intermediate spiral galaxy in the constellation Sculptor. The Sculptor Galaxy is a starburst galaxy, which means that it is currently undergoing a period of intense star formation. The galaxy was discovered by Caroline Herschel in 1783 during one of her systematic comet searches. About half a century later, John Herschel observed it using his 18-inch metallic mirror reflector at the Cape of Good Hope.  He wrote,”very bright and large (24′ in length); a superb object…. Its light is somewhat streaky, but I see no stars in it except 4 large and one very small one, and these seem not to belong to it, there being many near…”

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Takahashi FSQ106EDXIII
Imaging cameras: QSI 683WSG8
Mounts: Astro-Physics Mach1 GTO
Guiding cameras: SBIG STi
Filters: Astrodon LRGB CCD Gen II E-Series
Resolution: 1510×1004
Integration: 0.0 hours
RA center: 11.888 degrees
DEC center: -25.300 degrees
Pixel scale: 2.095 arcsec/pixel
Orientation: 179.312 degrees
Field radius: 0.527 degrees

Author: Neale Walters

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The Sculptor Galaxy, the Silver Coin, NGC 253

10фев

The Sculptor Galaxy, also known as the Silver Coin or Silver Dollar Galaxy, NGC 253, is an intermediate spiral galaxy in the constellation Sculptor. The Sculptor Galaxy is a starburst galaxy, which means that it is currently undergoing a period of intense star formation.The galaxy was discovered by Caroline Herschel in 1783 during one of her systematic comet searches. About half a century later, John Herschel observed it using his 18-inch metallic mirror reflector at the Cape of Good Hope. He wrote, “very bright and large (24′ in length); a superb object…. Its light is somewhat streaky, but I see no stars in it except 4 large and one very small one, and these seem not to belong to it, there being many near…”

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Sky-Watcher 200/1200 reflector
Imaging cameras: Canon EOS 400D / Digital Rebel XTi
Mounts: EQ6
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Tasco 60mm f/11.7 refractor
Guiding cameras: Philips Toucam
Software: DeepSkyStacker,  photoshop
Filters: HUTECH IDAS LPS-P2-48
Resolution: 1921×1469
Dates: Dec. 2, 2011
Frames: 28×300″ bin 1×1
Integration: 2.3 hours
Avg. Moon age: 7.00 days
Avg. Moon phase: 45.90%
RA center: 11.889 degrees
DEC center: -25.312 degrees
Pixel scale: 1.369 arcsec/pixel
Orientation: 7.024 degrees
Field radius: 0.460 degrees
Locations: Adelaide, None
Author:  spin_city

NGC 253: Dusty Island Universe 

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Image Credit & Copyright: László Francsics
 

 Shiny NGC 253 is one of the brightest spiral galaxies visible, and also one of the dustiest. Some call it the Silver Dollar Galaxy for its appearance in small telescopes, or just the Sculptor Galaxy for its location within the boundaries of the southern constellation Sculptor. First swept up in 1783 by mathematician and astronomer Caroline Herschel, the dusty island universe lies a mere 10 million light-years away. About 70 thousand light-years across, NGC 253 is the largest member of the Sculptor Group of Galaxies, the nearest to our own Local Group of Galaxies. In addition to its spiral dust lanes, tendrils of dust seem to be rising from a galactic disk laced with young star clusters and star forming regions in this sharp color image. The high dust content accompanies frantic star formation, earning NGC 253 the designation of a starburst galaxy. NGC 253 is also known to be a strong source of high-energy x-rays and gamma rays, likely due to massives black hole near the galaxy’s center.

APOD NASA 26-Jul-2014

NGC 253: Sculptor Galaxy

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As one of the brightest galaxies in the sky, the Sculptor Galaxy can be seen through binoculars and is near the star Beta Ceti. It is considered one of the most easily viewed galaxies in the sky after the Andromeda Galaxy.

The Sculptor Galaxy is a good target for observation with a telescope with a 300 mm diameter or larger. In such telescopes, it appears as a galaxy with a long, oval bulge and a mottled disc. Although the bulge appears only slightly brighter than the rest of the galaxy, it is fairly extended compared to the disk. In 400 mm scopes and larger, a dark dust lane northwest of the nucleus is visible, and over a dozen faint stars can be seen superimposed on the bulge.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Astro-Physics 152mm f/7.5 Starfire EDF
Imaging cameras: FLI ProLine Proline 16803
Mounts: Software Bisque Paramount MX
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Takahashi FS-60C
Guiding cameras: Starlight Xpress Superstar
Focal reducers: Astro-Physics AP 4.0″ Field Flattener
Software: PixInsight 1.8, Software Bisque TheSky6 Professional, FocusMax, Cyanogen Maxim DL Pro 5, Photoshop CS Photo Shop CS5, CCD Autopilot 5
Filters: Astrodon E-series LRGB Ha 5nm
Accessories: Sirius Dome
Dates: Nov. 27, 2013
Locations: Sydney Australia
Frames: 70×600″
Integration: 11.7 hours

Author: David Nguyen

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI

24 March 2014

The Sculptor Galaxy

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The Sculptor Galaxy, also known as the Silver Coin or Silver Dollar GalaxyNGC 253, is an intermediate spiral galaxy in the constellation Sculptor. The Sculptor Galaxy is a starburst galaxy, which means that it is currently undergoing a period of intense star formation.

As one of the brightest galaxies in the sky, the Sculptor Galaxy can be seen through 
binoculars and is near the star Beta Ceti. It is considered one of the most easily viewed galaxies in the sky after the Andromeda Galaxy.

The Sculptor Galaxy is a good target for observation with a telescope with a 300 mm diameter or larger. In such telescopes, it appears as a galaxy with a long, oval bulge and a mottled disc. Although the bulge appears only slightly brighter than the rest of the galaxy, it is fairly extended compared to the disk. In 400 mm scopes and larger, a dark dust lane northwest of the nucleus is visible, and over a dozen faint stars can be seen superimposed on the bulge.

Total Exposure Time : 7 hours (frames 600 seconds)
Camera : Apn 1000D modified
Telescope:Triplet Astrotech ed80mm

Autor: Alberto Barreiro Garcia

23 December 2013

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