Tag Archives: Wizard nebula

NGC7380 – Wizard nebula in Cepheus

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NGC 7380 (also known as the Wizard Nebula) is an open cluster discovered by Caroline Herschel in 1787. William Herschel included his sister’s discovery in his catalog, and labelled it H VIII.77. It is also known as 142 in the 1959 Sharpless catalog (Sh2-142). This reasonably large nebula is located in Cepheus. It is extremely difficult to observe visually, usually requiring very dark skies and an O-III filter.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: GSO 8″ f/8 RC
Imaging cameras: QSI 683wsg-8
Mounts: 10 Micron GM2000 QCI
Guiding cameras: Lodestar
Focal reducers: Astro-Physics CCDT67 reducer
Software: Adobe Photoshop CS5,  Pleiades Astrophoto PIXINSIGHT 1.8
Resolution: 3192×2465
Dates: Aug. 14, 2014
Frames:
Astrodon Blue Tru-Balance E-Series Gen 2: 7×480″ bin 2×2
Astrodon Green Tru-Balance E-Series Gen 2: 7×480″ bin 2×2
Astrodon Ha 5nm: 8×1800″ bin 1×1
Astrodon Luminance Tru-Balance E-Series Gen 2: 10×900″ -20C bin 1×1
Astrodon Red Tru-Balance E-Series Gen 2: 7×480″ bin 2×2
Integration: 9.3 hours
Avg. Moon age: 18.49 days
Avg. Moon phase: 85.08%
Mean FWHM: 2.60
RA center: 341.781 degrees
DEC center: 58.102 degrees
Pixel scale: 0.991 arcsec/pixel
Orientation: 2.297 degrees
Field radius: 0.555 degrees
Locations: AstroCamp remote observatory, Nerpio, Spain
Author: Stellario

The Wizard Nebula 

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 Image Credit & Copyright: Michael Miller

 Open star cluster NGC 7380 is still embedded in its natal cloud of interstellar gas and dust popularly known as the Wizard Nebula. Seen with foreground and background stars along the plane of our Milky Way galaxy it lies some 8,000 light-years distant, toward the constellation Cepheus. A full moon would easily fit inside this telescopic view of the 4 million year young cluster and associated nebula, normally much too faint to be seen by eye. Made with telescope and camera firmly planted on Earth, the image reveals multi light-year sized shapes and structures within the Wizard in a color palette made popular in Hubble Space Telescope images. Recorded with narrowband filters, the visible wavelength light from the nebula’s hydrogen, oxygen, and sulfur atoms is transformed into green, blue, and red colors in the final digital composite.

APOD NASA 29-Aug-14

Wizard Nebula

cc55079d2db41537ff36e38a30276cc0.1824x0_q100_watermark_watermark_opacity-4_watermark_position-6_watermark_text-Copyright Alberto Pisabarro
NGC 7380
 (also known as the Wizard Nebula) is an open cluster discovered by Caroline Herschel in 1787. William Herschel included his sister’s discovery in his catalog, and labelled it H VIII.77. It is also known as 142 in the 1959 Sharpless catalog (Sh2-142). This reasonably large nebula is located in Cepheus. It is extremely difficult to observe visually, usually requiring very dark skies and an O-III filter.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Sky-Watcher ED80 Pro Black-Diamond
Imaging cameras: Canon EOS 1000D / Rebel XS
Mounts: Sky-Watcher HEQ5
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Lunatico EZG60
Guiding cameras: QHYCCD QHY5
Focal reducers: Orion 0.85x Reducer/Corrector
Software: PHD guiding, PixInsight, BinaryRivers BackyardEOS, Bahtinov Grabber
Filters: Astronomik CLS CCD clip in
Accessories: Xap Refrigeración Canon
Dates: Aug. 11, 2013
Frames: Astronomik CLS CCD clip in: 20×600″ ISO800 6C
Integration: 3.3 hours
Darks: ~20
Bias: ~20

Author: Alberto Pisabarro
AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI 17 Aug 2014

Wizard nebula in Cepheus

37515c78aa427ba4fca600bcc3ad67f6.1824x0_q100_watermark Located only 8,000 light years away, the Wizard nebula surrounds developing open star cluster NGC 7380. Visually, the interplay of stars, gas, and dust has created a shape that appears to some like a fictional medieval sorcerer. The active star forming region spans 100 about light years, making it appear larger than the angular extent of the Moon. The Wizard Nebula can be located with a small telescope toward the constellation of Cepheus. Although the nebula may last only a few million years, some of the stars being formed may outlive our Sun.

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Takahashi TOA-150
Imaging cameras: QHYCCD QHY 11
Mounts: Software Bisque Paramount MX
Guiding telescopes or lenses: Astro-Tech TSAPO65Q
Software: Maxim DL, PixInsight LE, CCDStack2
Filters: Baader LRGB Ha SII OIII 2″
Accessories: SBIG STI
Dates: Aug. 5, 2013
Frames: 32×1200″
Integration: 10.7 hours

Author: Steve Yan

AstroPhotography of the day by SPONLI
05 May 2014